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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...

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Old June 29th, 2015, 06:49 PM   #1
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Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Charlottesville Virginia
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Fasten Your Seatbelts...

Sometimes I am happy with a video, but more often than not, I see ways I can improve and do a better job the next time. Overall, I'm never fully statisfied with the video, but for the sake of a deadline and/or the next job, I have to call it "done," upload it, and move on to the next edit.

I take a big sigh and hit "upload." But then I see the post on Facebook reach thousands of people and develop hundreds of comments, likes, shares. It is easy to kind get caught up in that. Start to feel like you really are doing a great job and that you truly are creating something unique.

But then you see the work from others or some of the cinematic wedding filmmakers out there. You see the places they travel and the weddings they attend. And you realize you are still just blowing in that same dust cloud with many others. Sure you left a mark, but you really didn't leave a permanent impact. According to Wedding Wire, there are nearly 150 other people that do what I do in my area alone. That's when I start the descent and raise my tray in it's upright position to jump on the next project and do a better job this time.

So, for me, it's a roller coaster ride of emotions. To put a ton of energy into the creation of a piece I am happy enough with to release to the public. To experience the positive feedback, and then abruptly lower the landing gear and get back on that runway where I have so much ground in front of me that I still need to cover.
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Old June 29th, 2015, 07:12 PM   #2
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Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Re: Fasten Your Seatbelts...

Hi Ian

You are running a business so from a business point of view there are times where you have to say "That's good enough" .. OK you could play and adjust a tiny segment of footage for hours or even days but do you really think the bride will notice your huge amount of work. The only end result you want is the bride to say "We loved our video" ..if you get to that stage then you have done your job. Enhancing footage to make you happy and getting it to the stage where you can say 'That's the best I have ever done" might make you happy but it's not going to impress the bank manager when you have worked on an edit for 60 hours and got paid for 20! If you want to blow every bride away with your awesome skills then it can be done IF you charge $15K for a job that normally costs a fraction of that but there still is no guarantee that you will take every single bride into a state of pure admiration for your work. As long as they are happy and don't complain then you are doing your job!
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Old June 29th, 2015, 08:24 PM   #3
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Re: Fasten Your Seatbelts...

For me there are three things I get out of the work I do. And they are very different.

1) Paid. and its way better pay than the job I had before. So yea, that's nice. But this rather basic business/financial part is never going to be something that invigorates or motivates me. Thats all about numbers 2 and 3.

2) Good feedback from the client. Knowing they are glad they chose me. Knowing I have actually given them something that will give them joy years after they've faded from my memory. Rating and testimonials - that feels great to me.

3) Here's the next level. Impressing my peers, or at least other creative types. Being so good that you impress people who are not the same demographic as my regular clients. Perhaps even being semi-viral. That's what I would like. But I'm nowhere near it.

I'm too busy just earning and doing what I know I can do for a price that seems to bring me a good amount of clients. Too busy to hone my skills, or consider strategies for a shift towards a different demographic of client. Or practice different technigues/skills. As a family man, I still will always be careful with money. I don't feel I can justify pouring all my profit straight back into every single gadget that pops up, even if it might give me an eye-catching shot (eg. drones).

But yea, Ian, I sympathise with you.
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