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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old March 2nd, 2006, 01:02 AM   #16
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You're thinking along the right lines. It's almost rule number one in sales not to quote a price right away. I'll try to remember to drop you an email that goes into a little more detail on strategies for dealing with the "how much does it cost" shopper. Basically, you should always be responding to that with a question that probes what it is they really want, and if indeed all they want is the lowest price on anything that remotely resembles the product or service in question (in this case video production), then you'll almost always want to politely end the conversation fairly quickly, and move on.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 01:20 AM   #17
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I face the same problems. Most brides aren't even considering paying for a wedding video, which makes our job really difficult right from the start. It's also not something most brides get real excited about even if they are thinking about it. Wedding shows are, in my opinion, the best place to get your business because you can show your work and talk to the bride.

I currently list my prices on my website because it annoys me to go to websites where the prices aren't listed. However, my wife (a photographer) doesn't list hers, and she's doing very well. So, I'm starting to lean toward that way. I might lose some people who don't want to submit their email or call me, but I'd be losing people because they weren't talking to me as well.

Morbid curiosity has gotten the better of me as well . . . email me the link . . . d:-)
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 05:32 AM   #18
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Travis check your email.

I think we should all band together, pool our money for a national primetime add campaign that runs during american idol. Something more has to be done to build up the industry.

I believe, at least in my area, the single biggest problem is that brides just don't realize the possibilities.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 05:52 AM   #19
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Travis - It's almost painful to watch ...LOL.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 10:15 AM   #20
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morbid curiosity :)

Matt, my curiosity is getting the best of me as well... mainly because I'm just starting out and have only done 1 wedding. I've been working on a demo and would really like to see this guy's to compare.

Thanks,
Chad
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 11:14 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Trubac
I definitly could do some CC work, but with weddings, and the average associated pay, as much as I don't like to say it, there has got to be a line somewhere... doesn't there? If not I could work on the same wedding for months, years, or forever!

I bet 9 times out of 10 the average wedding client would never notice the difference between a color corrected version and the original, unless the original color was drastically off, or the effect was drastic.

I would do the CC work (if you know what you're doing -biggy!). I CC every video I do and the more CC work I do - the faster it goes. I would estimate that I now spend just 20-30 minutes color correcting per video. It's not that big of a deal.

Maybe most people wouldn't notice (consiously) but consider that much of the percieved difference between "professional" and "amature" are those things that the average person can't quite put their finger on - but they know it when they see it! I think color is one of those things and the other even bigger one is sound... but that's another thread!

IMHO if you are shooting with two different camera's you MUST color correct and match hue to make it look right. Remember that whoever watches any video you've done, no matter what package you've sold, they will assume it's the best representation of your work. A friend watching this newlyweds video will not take into consideration the price paid and assume you can do better.

You are never just selling a $1300 video - you are selling a $1300 video and courting future customers.

Last edited by Craig Terott; March 2nd, 2006 at 02:52 PM.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 12:01 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Terott
I would do the CC work (if you know what you're doing -biggy!). I CC every video I do and the more CC work I do - the faster it goes. I would estimate that I know spend just 20-30 minutes color correcting per video. It's not that big of a deal.

Maybe most people wouldn't notice (consiously) but consider that much of the percieved difference between "professional" and "amature" are those things that the average person can't quite put their finger on - but they know it when they see it! I think color is one of those things and the other even bigger one is sound... but that's another thread!

IMHO if you are shooting with two different camera's you MUST color correct and match hue to make it look right. Remember that whoever watches any video you've done, no matter what package you've sold, they will assume it's the best representation of your work. A friend watching this newlyweds video will not take into consideration the price paid and assume you can do better.

You are never just selling a $1300 video - you are selling a $1300 video and courting future customers.

I do agree with you completely.

The clip from the wedding posted here was filmed with two DVX100a's.

I have since sold these cams and picked up a PD170 and a VX2100. Can't say I'm extremely pleased with the switch... the sony's are good, but I am missing the manual controls on the DVX. I also wish I had 16:9 but can live without it for the time being.

I would like to offer HD within the next year and a half to two years.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 12:30 PM   #23
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What are you considering for your HD cameras? I've been looking/comparing the XL-H1 and the JVC HD100U for HD cameras. I really like the XL H1 because of the shoulder support, but the HD100U is so much cheaper. I just can't decide...
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 01:37 PM   #24
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HD Cameras

I'm hoping that within a year and a half or two years HD will have greater market penetration (as far as people with HDTV's and the needed hardware to play back HD-DVD or BluRay), and that there will be some better HD camera options on the market. Right now I like the XLH1... I would like to think that the HVX200 looks promising too, but alot of what I have read is that there isn't much out right now that is very well suited for wedding videography.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 01:58 PM   #25
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I'm also waiting for the demand/playability. I'd like to offer HD in addition to my SD, and I figured the price would come down when the popularity gets up. Remember when DVD burners were $400?.

By the way, that video is hilarious! I wouldn't pay $40 for his videos
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 04:25 PM   #26
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I do remember $400 DVD Burners.

I saw a video on CNET a few weeks ago for an HD-DVD player that is going to retail for $1800.00 due out this year. It will take a couple years before more than a fraction of a percent of the population has one of these connected to their home theater.

I do consider the fact that shooting HD would yield a better SD picture, and that there may be some $$ in selling remastered HD versions of todays weddings over the next 5-10 years. If business picks up over the next year I may make the jump sooner. I'm waiting for now though.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 04:31 PM   #27
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Okay, the website alone was painful to look at. Then I get to the video, and what the heck is that? Seriously, this is the one case where uncle Bob probably could have done a better job.

Does this guy just set up a camera on a tripod and leave it while he shoots? That's what it looked like to me. Wow.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 04:39 PM   #28
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For me, I'm not ready to invest in HD yet. The HD cameras available in my price range just aren't capable enough yet. Also, the percentage of my clients who own an HD display is pretty small still. Finally, the distribution format for HD material (HD-DVD and Blu-Ray) hasn't been ironed out yet, so it seems like a waste of money to invest in cameras and equipment just yet.

I'm thinking 2-5 years for the HD switch. Bottom line for me is that it has to be a profitable switch. I can't just do it because I want to work in HD. d:-(
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 04:40 PM   #29
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At first I thought you were talking about my website and my video. It took a second to click, its been a long day.

But yes, his website looks very mid 90's, designed by a fourth grader. Photographers.... ... .. . at least they aren't all bad.
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Old March 2nd, 2006, 05:00 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis Cossel
Does this guy just set up a camera on a tripod and leave it while he shoots? That's what it looked like to me. Wow.
The ultimate in ultra-low-budget production. This guy deserves the rotten tomato award. He earned it fair and square.
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