Interview Microphone at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 7th, 2006, 02:52 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 53
Interview Microphone

It seems that doing guest interviews are very popular in my area since all the brides are wanting them. Last year I used a microphone that I was very disappointed with (you could hear a static if the person holding it moved around too much). What brand/model do you use for guest interviews? I want something quick to set up so if I have a couple moments during the reception I can get it out and grab an interview or 2. (I use canon's gl2's and xl's.)
Jennifer Graves is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2006, 03:02 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Jupiter, FL
Posts: 565
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...goryNavigation

Take a look at this. I have used one of these for years and never had a problem.

Mark
Mark Bournes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2006, 03:30 PM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 419
If you're doing interviews in a noisy area....the Sure SM58 handhled mic is really nice and will block out a lot of the background noise. I used this mic in a night club with music cranking, and was able to capture interview audio with no problem of having the background music competing.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer Graves
It seems that doing guest interviews are very popular in my area since all the brides are wanting them. Last year I used a microphone that I was very disappointed with (you could hear a static if the person holding it moved around too much). What brand/model do you use for guest interviews? I want something quick to set up so if I have a couple moments during the reception I can get it out and grab an interview or 2. (I use canon's gl2's and xl's.)
Joe Allen Rosenberger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2006, 05:08 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
The standbys are the SM58, Electrovoice RE50 (doubles as a hammer when needed) and the Shure SM63-not quite the amount of noise deflection as the SM58 BUT works great with someone who feels they need to hold the mic somewhere about belt region.

Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2006, 09:19 PM   #5
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Aus
Posts: 3,884
Video guestbooks.. what do u do??

Usually i set up a cam on a tripod across from a table, and print up some instructions and tape that to the table.

I then Blue Tak an infrared remote to the table and use a Senny K6 ME64 mic. I wire this up so they have a visual element and so that my gear doesnt go walkabouts
All this is done in the reception

Basically, the instructions tell them to hit the record button on the remote and when the red light comes on, to start talking into the mic. I havent had audio issues with this, as the mic itself is great for isolation.

Now from here, once were set, i tell the MC about it and get them to read out the instructions. Usually its quite funny, and this method works.

However i am just wondering if this is a common practice?? Am i missing something?? I dont feel that i am, but for some reason it jsut feels that its lacking something.. ?? Maybe the human touch??? the idea of it is to NOT have someone in ur face with a camera, but im thinking now maybe i should get some portable shower curtains or something and create a "video booth"

These video guestbooks are getting more popular by the day... but its wierd.. i cant explain it.. it just feels a little strained and forced??

Any ideas?? What do u do?? What would u do??
Peter Jefferson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2006, 10:26 AM   #6
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 53
I have never seen this technique done in my area (isolated camera with guests controling it themself). Personally, I would be scared to death to leave a camera sitting by itself. I have always walked around and spoke with guests personally asking if they would like to do a message, however it does make me a little uncomfortable because the most common response I get is "maybe after a few more drinks." I can't force anyone to talk, but the bride and groom are paying for these interviews and really want them. If there is an easier way, I'm willing to try it. :)
Jennifer Graves is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2006, 10:40 AM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Jupiter, FL
Posts: 565
Jennifer, the best place to set this up is in the hallway outside the main entrance of the reception. This way you can grab people as they are leaving for a quick word to the bride and groom. Most people at the reception are willing to do this on their way out. Also check out the mic I suggested earlier, it's a solid handheld mic for this run and gun situation.
Hope that helps you,
Mark
Mark Bournes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2006, 11:27 AM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Waterloo Ontario
Posts: 721
This technique has never failed me.

Now that we have shifted from mic model to technique I will share a nearly foolproof method.

Find a junior reporter. No guest can resist the request of a 9 year old for a few pithy remarks. All she/he needs is a catchy single sentance that can't be answered with yes or no. You might have to pay your talent, but 5 bucks at that age is like gold.

Also, since you can't smoke indoors anymore most of those who dart out for a butt are also a wee bit drunk. These are the classiest interviews. Especially the younger brother of the bride who isn't married yet and drives an import car with an artificially large tailpipe. But I'm not stereotyping.
Jimmy McKenzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2006, 11:39 AM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 688
Part of my sales pitch...

I don't conduct interviews. I hand a wireless microphone to guests and family wherever they may be (wireless is very important to make it easy no matter where you are) and ask them if they would like to say something to you.

Sometimes I'll get just a "congratulations Shawn & Kristin" or sometimes I'll get a funny speach full of well-wishes. The point is that this technique serves very well to "keep it real" on your video and it's always more fun to watch. I show them examples of both and they are always laughing and smiling at the "keep it real" sample. Ofcourse this has a lot to do with the samples I'm showing them - I realize!

The added benefit of the wireless handheld mic has been awesome. I look for opportunities every now and then, on the dance floor, to hand over the mic and get them singing into it. Every once in a while I get a group performance and some awesome video.

You can buy the Azden dual wireless with one body pack and with one wireless handheld microphone. That is what I have (& I bought and extra body pack transmitter too). During the reception I use the body pack for the record out on the DJs mixer and I can switch between the bodypack transmitter or the handheld and the whole time never cut off my on-camera mic.
Craig Terott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2006, 11:45 AM   #10
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Waterloo Ontario
Posts: 721
Great post above

Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Terott
I look for opportunities every now and then, on the dance floor, to hand over the mic and get them singing into it. Every once in a while I get a group performance and some awesome video.
That is just brilliant. Thanks for the great tip. I am going to have some fun with this....
Jimmy McKenzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2006, 05:14 PM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 419
Peter....cool idea, this could make an interesting "menu" option on the final dvd....sorta like MTV's Real World....when the housemates go into the confessional room, similar style.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Jefferson
Usually i set up a cam on a tripod across from a table, and print up some instructions and tape that to the table.

I then Blue Tak an infrared remote to the table and use a Senny K6 ME64 mic. I wire this up so they have a visual element and so that my gear doesnt go walkabouts
All this is done in the reception

Basically, the instructions tell them to hit the record button on the remote and when the red light comes on, to start talking into the mic. I havent had audio issues with this, as the mic itself is great for isolation.

Now from here, once were set, i tell the MC about it and get them to read out the instructions. Usually its quite funny, and this method works.

However i am just wondering if this is a common practice?? Am i missing something?? I dont feel that i am, but for some reason it jsut feels that its lacking something.. ?? Maybe the human touch??? the idea of it is to NOT have someone in ur face with a camera, but im thinking now maybe i should get some portable shower curtains or something and create a "video booth"

These video guestbooks are getting more popular by the day... but its wierd.. i cant explain it.. it just feels a little strained and forced??

Any ideas?? What do u do?? What would u do??
Joe Allen Rosenberger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 8th, 2006, 11:00 PM   #12
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Aus
Posts: 3,884
Yeah Joe, this kinda thing is really picking up down here. Video guestbooks have been a request now for almost 40% of bookings, and i always tell teh client that even though i set it up for a fun frolic on video, sometimes the crowds jsut arent in it.
In that case i just grab a camera and do my usual table runs. From there you can pick up whos responsive and who isnt. From the responsive ones, i usually ask them if theyd like to leave afew words, and 99% of the time they do, but there are the few who are like "after afew more"
Now becuase this "after afew more" is common I turn it into a funny repeated VoxPop. I guess it breaks the monotony of table after table and its funny to see peoples demise as teh alcohol sets in :)

With the Big Bro video booth, the problem with it is that in a concealed curtain, i cant see whats going on with the camera. Out in the open however i just have to glance at it and im OK.

With regard to security, people at weddings are usually far more respectable in regards to property than any other market. Your gear is USUALLY safe, but obviously the Trust NoOne factor always plays in your mind.
Peter Jefferson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2006, 02:35 AM   #13
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Warren, Michigan, USA
Posts: 96
I use an Audio-Technica cordless handheld that's really meant for DJ use. It's a good UHF system and does a good job blocking out background noise. If someone jostles the mic and makes rumbly sounds, oh well. I prefer my guest interviews to be a bit on the raw side - I just grab whoever I can find who's willing to do it, and I normally start off with a montage of guests saying things like "are we recording?...what do I say?", then jump around from guest to guest, making it as humorous/entertaining as possible (it's best when the guests have been drinking and have no idea what to say!). Here's my latest example, shot December 30, 2005:

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/jdthedj/greetings.wmv

As it turned out, this was the swan song for the good ol' Sony VX1000, which was a real workhorse. I turned it in to the company I contract most of my work through (it belongs to them), and they're putting it out to pasture, using it only for occasional internal work. All my work from now on will be with the PD150 I got through eBay in January. My first shoot of the year will be March 25 - can't wait!
John Harmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2006, 08:15 AM   #14
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Harmon
I use an Audio-Technica cordless handheld that's really meant for DJ use. It's a good UHF system and does a good job blocking out background noise. If someone jostles the mic and makes rumbly sounds, oh well. I prefer my guest interviews to be a bit on the raw side - I just grab whoever I can find who's willing to do it, and I normally start off with a montage of guests saying things like "are we recording?...what do I say?", then jump around from guest to guest, making it as humorous/entertaining as possible (it's best when the guests have been drinking and have no idea what to say!). Here's my latest example, shot December 30, 2005:

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/jdthedj/greetings.wmv

As it turned out, this was the swan song for the good ol' Sony VX1000, which was a real workhorse. I turned it in to the company I contract most of my work through (it belongs to them), and they're putting it out to pasture, using it only for occasional internal work. All my work from now on will be with the PD150 I got through eBay in January. My first shoot of the year will be March 25 - can't wait!
John,

Thanks for posting.

This is just constructive critism - don't shoot me! The camera was way, way, way too far away. There is no need to see peoples legs. If you want your work to look more professional get the camera close and wide for this kind of thing - and use a light! You want to read the expressions on peoples faces.

I thought the editing was very interesting and I think you probably made something that could have been somewhat boring - a lot more interesting to watch. Kudos on that.
Craig Terott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2006, 03:07 AM   #15
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Warren, Michigan, USA
Posts: 96
Yeah, I should have encoded that at a higher bitrate - trust me, the real version is nice and clear, if a bit on the dark side.

I now have a light - that Sony one with the twin lamps. Bright enough to use in a pitch-dark room, even when using just one lamp.

This will be my third year in the business - I first jumped from DJ to videographer in July '04 (it went something like this: "Do you have a DV camera? Do you have a tripod? Do you know what you're doing? OK, you're a videographer."). I actually used a 1-chip JVC DVL-120U (my $400 wonder) that first year, basically because that was all I had. The VX1000's were in the shop getting overhauled - I used them last year with my trusty Panasonic PV-GS120 as backup. I've gotten my, er, stuff together since then, and I'm expecting good things this year.
John Harmon is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Special Interest Areas > Wedding / Event Videography Techniques

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:55 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network