AVI files split at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Windows / PC Post Production Solutions > What Happens in Vegas...

What Happens in Vegas...
...stays in Vegas! This PC-based editing app is a safe bet with these tips.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old February 5th, 2008, 05:43 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Co Tyrone Ireland
Posts: 60
AVI files split

I am just after rendering a one hour AVI file in vegas 8 when it was rendered it was split into five different files why did this happen and how do I prevent it from doing this again
Thomas
Thomas Quinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2008, 06:13 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hillsborough, NC, USA
Posts: 968
What size are the files? Are they the same?

There is an option in Vegas to make sure that AVI files are created with OpenDML 2.0 compatibility:

"Create an OpenDML (AVI version 2.0) compatible file" under the Video tab when selecting Render As...

If this isn't set, you will get fragmented files.
John Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2008, 06:14 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Minnesota (USA)
Posts: 2,171
Is the hard drive formatted as FAT32?
Robert M Wright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2008, 07:28 PM   #4
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Co Tyrone Ireland
Posts: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Miller View Post
What size are the files? Are they the same?

There is an option in Vegas to make sure that AVI files are created with OpenDML 2.0 compatibility:

"Create an OpenDML (AVI version 2.0) compatible file" under the Video tab when selecting Render As...

If this isn't set, you will get fragmented files.
The files are all the same size 3.99 gig I have the openDML box ticked (should it be ticked) and yes the hard drive formatted as FAT32
Thomas
Thomas Quinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2008, 07:57 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Sacramento, Elk Grove. Calif
Posts: 305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Quinn View Post
The files are all the same size 3.99 gig I have the openDML box ticked (should it be ticked) and yes the hard drive formatted as FAT32
Thomas
Thats your problem, the drive needs to be formatted NTFS!
__________________
Puttin the wet stuff on the red stuff!
Terry Esslinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2008, 08:06 PM   #6
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Camas, WA, USA
Posts: 5,513
It's pretty cool that it will split the files if on FAT32 though. It sure beats a crashed render.
__________________
Jon Fairhurst
Jon Fairhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2008, 04:33 AM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Co Tyrone Ireland
Posts: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Esslinger View Post
Thats your problem, the drive needs to be formatted NTFS!
Terry -& John
Thanks for your help on this I still a lot to learn about Vegas even after 3 years
Thomas
Thomas Quinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2008, 07:51 AM   #8
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: El Paso
Posts: 35
Thomas, the 4GB file size limit isn't a Vegas limitation, it is a limitation of the Fat32. Do yourself a favor and switch the drive over to NTFS. This will NOT destroy any of the files and besides allowing for larger files, it is much more efficient.
Jim Day is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2008, 09:50 AM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Windsor, ON Canada
Posts: 2,765
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Day View Post
Thomas, the 4GB file size limit isn't a Vegas limitation, it is a limitation of the Fat32. Do yourself a favor and switch the drive over to NTFS. This will NOT destroy any of the files and besides allowing for larger files, it is much more efficient.

Be advised that, if not done properly, ALL data WILL be erased :-(


How to convert a FAT16 volume or a FAT32 volume to an NTFS file system in Windows XP is from the Microsoft site on how to do this AND keep your existing data.

IMO,the first part of these instructions should ALWAYS be followed, no matter what you're doing to a hard drive's data.


How to convert a FAT volume or a FAT32 volume to NTFS

Note Although the chance of corruption or data loss during the conversion is minimal, we recommend that you perform a backup of the data on the volume that you want to convert before you start the conversion.

To convert an existing FAT or FAT32 volume to NTFS, follow these steps:

1. Click [b]Start[/b}, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Command Prompt.

2. At the command prompt, type the following, where drive letter is the drive that you want to convert:

convert [u]drive letter[u]: /fs:ntfs

For example, type the following command to convert drive E to NTFS:

convert e: /fs:ntfs

Note If the operating system is on the drive that you are converting, you will be prompted to schedule the task when you restart the computer because the conversion cannot be completed while the operating system is running. When you are prompted, click YES.

3. When you receive the following message at the command prompt, type the volume label of the drive that you are converting, and then press ENTER:

The type of the file system is FAT.
Enter the current volume label for drive drive letter

4. When the conversion to NTFS is complete, you receive the following message at the command prompt:

Conversion complete

5. Quit the command prompt.
Mike Kujbida is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2008, 11:21 AM   #10
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hillsborough, NC, USA
Posts: 968
I strongly recommend the follow procedure if you can do so:

1. Copy the entire contents of the FAT32 drive to another drive with enough space.
2. Quick format the drive to NTFS
3. Copy all the files back

It will be much, much, much quicker this way if you have many GBs of files. It will also be bomb proof. i.e., if the convert function messes up or there's some other failure during conversion, you won't be too happy.

Also, if the 4GB files are as a result of rendering, you might want to consider rendering again after converting the drive to NTFS. If so, delete the existing rendered files before converting to save time. If the drive contains nothing but rendered files, I'd just quick format it to NTFS and render the project again. That way you end up with a single file.
John Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2008, 01:46 PM   #11
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Co Tyrone Ireland
Posts: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Miller View Post
I strongly recommend the follow procedure if you can do so:

1. Copy the entire contents of the FAT32 drive to another drive with enough space.
2. Quick format the drive to NTFS
3. Copy all the files back
Done just that as this was a new external USB 2 hard drive and had little on it I usually use my second hard drives via a cradle system
Thomas
Thomas Quinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 10:21 PM   #12
Trustee
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Boise, Idaho
Posts: 1,997
Render

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Miller View Post
What size are the files? Are they the same?

There is an option in Vegas to make sure that AVI files are created with OpenDML 2.0 compatibility:

"Create an OpenDML (AVI version 2.0) compatible file" under the Video tab when selecting Render As...

If this isn't set, you will get fragmented files.
I have used a utility (since forgot the name) to split my extremely large AVIs from capture. IT was extremely fast because it just copied the file up to the split point. Rendering out via Vegas takes a LONG time compared to a file copy with any split utility. There has to be a better option! I suppose Vegas is not designed to have that kind of functionality so I should be surprised. But the render was significantly longer than a split so I Have to suspect that Vegas did something other than just copy the data. Something was taking the extra time, but what? Were artifacts introduced using the Vegas render? I just don't trust that the render to avi (uncompressed) didn't alter the media in some way.
Jason Robinson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 11:33 PM   #13
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Hillsborough, NC, USA
Posts: 968
Interesting.

I've just run some tests and have determined that, for DV AVIs, even when Vegas doesn't need to recompress, it regenerates the DV frames rather than just copying the existing DV frame data.

What I mean by this is that a DV frame consists of the compressed video, audio and subdata (such as timecode etc). Even the simplest editors such as Windows Movie Maker just copy the entire frame when recompression isn't required. Vegas appears to generate a new frame even though the video and audio parts are the same. Effectively, it unpacks and then repacks the video, audio and subdata. This, of course, requires additional processing and is unnecessary.

If you take an existing DV AVI clip and render it from Movie Maker, you will find that all the subdata remain intact. With Vegas, however, new subdata get written - completely new timecode, date and time, camera settings etc. The new date and time are derived from the computer's clock.

I find this odd behavior and, for me, rather frustrating since I prefer to maintain the original subcode data when making simple cut edits - especially the camera settings.

Perhaps there's a setting to prevent this but I haven't found it.
John Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2008, 05:00 AM   #14
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Sammamish, WA
Posts: 398
I'm surprised Vegas split the files TBH...

Fat32 is old and annoying :o

The only reason to have Fat32 is on an external to be compatible with Macs... If you're on Windows XP/Vista... NTFS is the way :)

I think I accidently rendered a 100GB file once... had some settings wrong at some point and walked away... came back to find 1/5th of my drive filled up with 1 file...
Joe Busch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2008, 11:01 PM   #15
Trustee
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Boise, Idaho
Posts: 1,997
Woah there....

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Miller View Post
Interesting. I've just run some tests and have determined that, for DV AVIs, even when Vegas doesn't need to recompress, it regenerates the DV frames rather than just copying the existing DV frame data.
I just went back and looked at the files that Vegas8 created. 45GB and 30GB from a single 6GB avi! So something went drastically wrong in the AVI creation. I choose file type "AVI" and under the template, choose "Uncompressed"

That is what caused the massive files to be created. When I chose the "NTSC DV" template, the render window says "No Recompression Required" and absolutely zips along because it is just copying data.

So the lesson here is pay attention to the template being used because "uncompressed" must be doing something different.
Jason Robinson is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Windows / PC Post Production Solutions > What Happens in Vegas...

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:32 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network