Help with burning to DVD! at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Windows / PC Post Production Solutions > What Happens in Vegas...

What Happens in Vegas...
...stays in Vegas! This PC-based editing app is a safe bet with these tips.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old April 23rd, 2010, 03:47 PM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 623
Help with burning to DVD!

Okay, I've rendered in Sony Vegas 9 Pro to both a wmv file and an mpg-2 file. Quality looks good. However, when I burn to DVD it looks dull. The colors aren't very vivid, and the picture isn't as sharp. What am I doing wrong? I'm using Sony DVD Architect. I'm maxing out all the settings for highest quality. What is my best course of action to get the best looking DVD? What should I render to, what should I burn as, and everything else in between? There are a zillion options in these programs, it's overwhelming. Is there always quality loss when transferring to DVD? If so, how do pro movies look so good on DVD?
Patrick Janka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2010, 04:13 PM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
well, Hollywood DVDs aren't burned, they make a glass master and then they are pressed but besides that, have you burned one and looked at it on a TV? The preview screen in DVDA isn't all that great and frankly color should never be judged on a computer monitor. Also render the audio to AC3 since DVDA is going to recompress to AC3 anyway. It won't do anything to help video quality directly but it does make the audio file smaller which will aloow a higher bitrate if need be for the video. Name them both the same, IE; the wedding.mpg and the wedding.AC3 then in DVDA when you bring in one the other will automatically follow.
__________________
What do I know? I'm just a video-O-grafer.
Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2010, 04:35 PM   #3
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 8,421
Patrick, do NOT max out the settings for higher quality...leave at default values or lower. The higher settings only create possible playback issues for your burned DVD and do nothing to improve the images.

As has been said your DVD will almost never look as good as an avi file on computer.

The more important question is what camera are you using? My Canon HV30 can look great in Vegas, but the quality drops significantly on the teleivsion. That's just the way it is. The better your camera the better it will look on TV.
Jeff Harper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2010, 04:51 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Windsor, ON Canada
Posts: 2,765
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Janka View Post
Okay, I've rendered in Sony Vegas 9 Pro to both a wmv file and an mpg-2 file. Quality looks good. However, when I burn to DVD it looks dull. The colors aren't very vivid, and the picture isn't as sharp. What am I doing wrong? I'm using Sony DVD Architect. I'm maxing out all the settings for highest quality. What is my best course of action to get the best looking DVD? What should I render to, what should I burn as, and everything else in between? There are a zillion options in these programs, it's overwhelming.
Download and read Vol. 1 Issue 7 of Edward Troxel's excellent and free newsletters.
This particular one deals exclusively with dvd authoring.
While written for an earlier version of DVDA, everything is still applicable.

Quote:
Is there always quality loss when transferring to DVD?
If it's a hour video, it's (roughly) 13 GB. of data.
A DVD only holds 4.3 GB.
Something has to suffer and that's picture quality.
The old expression of GIGO (garbage in, garbage out) is very applicable in this business.
I shot a stage play last week that ran 2 1/2 hr.
I was certain that I'd have to put it on 2 DVDs but, after a trial run, I was so impressed with the overall quality that it stayed on a single disc.
I was using a 3 CCD camera with 1/2" chips and a good lens and that makes a lot of difference.

Quote:
If so, how do pro movies look so good on DVD?
Multi-million dollar production budgets, highly skilled crew and a DVD authoring process that uses equipment that costs a lot more than your house along with more highly skilled operators.
Mike Kujbida is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2010, 07:02 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 623
Thanks guys. I'm using a Canon XHA1.
Patrick Janka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 23rd, 2010, 07:03 PM   #6
Trustee
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Rhinelander, WI
Posts: 1,209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Janka View Post
Okay, I've rendered in Sony Vegas 9 Pro to both a wmv file and an mpg-2 file. Quality looks good. However, when I burn to DVD it looks dull.
While DVDs use MPEG-2 compression, at least two factors may be different from the MPEG-2 file you have made. One, the bit rate is probably lower on the DVD than in your computer file. Two, the DVD does not use square pixels, while your MPEG file probably does. If it is a widescreen DVD, the image is compressed to the width of 720 pixels. It is then expanded to the widescreen resolution when played. This compression will inevitably throw some data away, so the image is not as sharp as before and the color is duller.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Bloom View Post
Hollywood DVDs aren't burned, they make a glass master and then they are pressed
While that is true, I do not see how that would affect the video quality. It is the same digital data whether it is pressed or duplicated, is it not?
Adam Stanislav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old April 24th, 2010, 09:34 PM   #7
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Melrose Park, Illinois, USA
Posts: 936
What causes this loss of color information is the mismatch in color space between the video clip and Vegas' native color space. Those video clips are typically 4:1:1 (or 4:2:0) YUV while Vegas (and most other NLEs) natively operate in RGB. Your XHA1 operates in 4:2:2 YUV colorspace in HD mode. Thus, YUV videos are automatically converted to RGB in the NLE during import. Unfortunately, the NLEs themselves don't do a very good job of converting color spaces, which is why you see dull, muted colors in the finished product.

Also, the downconversion of HD content to SD has never been Vegas' (or most other NLEs') forte.
Randall Leong is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Windows / PC Post Production Solutions > What Happens in Vegas...

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:15 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network