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What Happens in Vegas...
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 08:27 AM   #1
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Sandy Bridge i7 2600K

Has any one ran Vegas on a new socket 1155 system (Sandy Bridge i7). I am trying to find out if I would be better building a new socket 1366 or a new socket 1155.
I am currently on an old DP35 socket 775 with a q6600 chip.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 08:50 AM   #2
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Has any one ran Vegas on a new socket 1155 system (Sandy Bridge i7). I am trying to find out if I would be better building a new socket 1366 or a new socket 1155.
I am currently on an old DP35 socket 775 with a q6600 chip.
Help
Two questions:

1) Are you going to add a discrete PCI-e hardware RAID controller card, such as those higher-end models from Areca, in the foreseeable future?

2) If you answered "Yes to 1), then are you going to add any additional PCI-e cards to any of the PCI-e x1 slots at all?

If you answered "Yes" to both, then don't go with any of the current LGA 1155 Sandy Bridge CPUs or motherboards as that entire platform has only four free PCI-e 2.0 lanes for internal expansion. Most P67 motherboards eat up four of the chipset's eight PCI-e lanes with onboard PCI-e to PCI bridge controllers, onboard USB 3.0 controllers and additional SATA/IDE controllers and onboard PCI-e NICs. Plus, P67 motherboards with a PCI-e x4 slot share the bandwidth of that x4 slot with any PCI-e x1 slots on such motherboards; thus, the x4 slot will drop to x1 mode if any x1 slots are occupied. If you must buy now if going with this configuration, stick with the older LGA 1366/X58 platform (only the i7-9xx CPUs are compatible with this platform). Otherwise, wait for LGA 2011 (or LGA 1356, if it ever gets introduced) before deciding on a new system.

If you answered "Yes" to 1) but "No" to 2), then make sure the P67 LGA 1155 motherboard that you choose has a PCI-e x4 slot (or more accurately, a PCI-e x16-sized slot running electrically at x4). (This is because current hardware RAID controller chips do not take full advantage of anything higher than PCI-e 1.0 x4 bandwidth.) Don't put the PCI-e RAID controller card into the second PCI-e "x16" slot if it's bifurcated from the primary PCI-e x16 slot; otherwise, the primary graphics card will run at only x8 instead of the full x16 mode. (Two examples: The Asus P67 motherboards provide one PCI-e x4 slot, which fits perfectly in this paragraph. The Intel-brand P67 motherboards, unfortunately, are ill-suited to anything more than a simple disk setup using only the onboard SATA RAID controller because they lack a PCI-e x4 slot, and the company's DP67BG's only two RAID card-compatible slots are the two x16 slots that share the CPU's 16 PCI-e lanes and thus the second slot is bifurcated from the primary x16 slot ~~ and despite Intel's leaning towards "legacy-free" motherboards, that company's P67 and H67 motherboards generally have more PCI-Legacy slots than most of the competition.)

If you answered "No" to 1), then it doesn't matter. Go with whichever platform that provides the best performance-to-price ratio with a KISS ("Keep It Stupidly Simple") disk setup.

In addition, if you have any PCI-Legacy cards (especially PCI Gigabit NICs) that you want to use on your new system, skip Sandy Bridge and stick with the older platforms: The PCI-e to PCI bridge controllers on Sandy Bridge motherboards deliver only about half the throughput of native PCI-Legacy-supporting chipsets.

And whichever platform you choose, I strongly recommend going with at least three hard drives (or one SSD and two hard drives) minimum. Systems with only one hard drive are very ill-suited to video editing ~~ and even two hard drives without a third internal storage device are less than ideal.

Hope this helps.

Last edited by Randall Leong; January 22nd, 2011 at 10:37 PM.
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 09:01 PM   #3
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And if you do decide to go with a P67 setup, check this article out which is pretty good..
The Battle of the P67 Boards - ASUS vs. Gigabyte at $190 - AnandTech :: Your Source for Hardware Analysis and News

Couldn't agree more with the post above, particulary on the SSD system drive (128Mb probably best bet) and then two fast HD's.. Spend your $$ there..

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Old January 23rd, 2011, 01:35 AM   #4
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The SSD boot disk was perhaps the best upgrade I ever made. I appreciate the added speed of the i7 940 that I put together recently, and I suppose the 12 GB RAM helps some (I recently saw RAM usage at over 8GB during a recent render); but the SSD made me love working on the computer.

At the time I bought it, I had about 140 programs installed, and they opened almost instantly. I just now opened Vegas 9 64-bit for the first time today, and it took exactly 5 seconds to load. My animation and other programs open equally fast, and boot time is just 20 seconds or so after BIOS does its thing. This SSD is about a year old and shows no signs of slowing down even though I use it maybe 10 hours per day.

Even with the 140 programs, I was using only 47 GB of my 80 GB drive. I kept it lean by eliminating hiberfil.sys and putting the pagefile on another disk. If you do that (learn how by searching the web), you can easily get by with an 80-GB SSD (I chose an Intel X-25).

Regarding motherboards, I totally agree with the above responses. That's why I went with the 1366 system even though the new unlocked 1156 chips can be just as fast - and are cheaper, along with lower-priced motherboards. Already I've a couple of additional PCI cards in addition to the PCIe-x 16 video card - with no worries about bandwidth.

Likewise ditto for the 3+ hard drives. I put video clips on one disk, stills on another, and render to a third. By having the stills on a separate disk, there is no head threshing when I put a still in the corner of a video clip, or cross fade, etc.

Actually, I now have 10 disks permanently connected to my editing computer: 5 disks for work, and 5 for backup. The latter are all connected through USB3 connections with independent power supplies - so that a failure in my computer power supply wouldn't kill them all.
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Old January 23rd, 2011, 01:08 PM   #5
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Thank You for your help,
I believe I will give the Asus P67 board a try, I use only one video card a (Quadro 4000) in the PCI-E lanes. and only three 600 GB hard drives (10,000 rpm WD) I wish I could afford a nice SSD but I am still making the change from tape to SXS cards and they are not cheep. Also I am switching over to Vegas Pro 10 from being a long time Edius user.

Again Thank You
Jeff KIng
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Old January 23rd, 2011, 05:00 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Jeff King View Post
Thank You for your help,
I believe I will give the Asus P67 board a try, I use only one video card a (Quadro 4000) in the PCI-E lanes. and only three 600 GB hard drives (10,000 rpm WD) I wish I could afford a nice SSD but I am still making the change from tape to SXS cards and they are not cheep. Also I am switching over to Vegas Pro 10 from being a long time Edius user.

Again Thank You
You should see a significant improvement in overall performance over your current system. Especially since that Intel DP35DP offers no overclocking capability whatsoever.
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Old January 24th, 2011, 12:02 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Jeff King View Post
Thank You for your help,
I believe I will give the Asus P67 board a try, I use only one video card a (Quadro 4000) in the PCI-E lanes. and only three 600 GB hard drives (10,000 rpm WD) I wish I could afford a nice SSD but I am still making the change from tape to SXS cards and they are not cheep. Also I am switching over to Vegas Pro 10 from being a long time Edius user.

Again Thank You
Jeff KIng
I dunno Jeff... if you're spending this much, using a Quadro 4000 and purchasing SXS cards, I can't see how you could avoid this purchase when now is the time to do it - on a clean fresh install..
Newegg.com - OCZ Agility 2 OCZSSD3-2AGT120G 3.5" 120GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

Find something you don't use in your house worth a couple hundred and sell it... You'll use this every day! :)
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Old January 24th, 2011, 08:30 AM   #8
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If I was to buy an SSD would it be best to use it as a system drive , then use one of my remaining three drives( 600 GB each) as a storage/work drive and last a raid 0 for encoding ?
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Old January 24th, 2011, 09:09 AM   #9
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It would be nice to have a super fast SSD drive for the OS, but wouldn't it be more effective for editing HD (or anything for that matter) to use it as a scratch drive, if you could only afford one?

Timeline performance suffers when I edit files on a slow drive. When I move HD files to a faster drive, things smooth out. I don't think a faster OS drive would help Vegas much, but I could be wrong. Yes it's cool when things load up quickly, but I use my fastest drive as a work drive because it's more practical.

Naturally, it would be best to have two SSDS, one for OS and one for working from, and then use other drives for storage.
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Old January 24th, 2011, 10:08 AM   #10
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I don't think a faster OS drive would help Vegas much, but I could be wrong.
It depends on how much memory you have. If the OS can completely load itself into the memory and stay there all the time and also load all the application software into the memory and keep it there until you close the application and, last but not least, if you have enough memory for the data of the application, then the speed of the OS drive makes little if any difference (essentially the only thing that would still be affected is reading from and writing to the registry).

If, on the other hand, you do not have enough memory, the OS has to reload parts of itself as needed and has to swap the data Vegas uses from the memory to the swap drive (which by default, is the system drive but can be changed) and back to the memory.
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Old January 24th, 2011, 05:35 PM   #11
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So since Vegas uses relatively little memory, and if Jeff's new system has at 12GB of ram, he should be fine either way.
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Old January 25th, 2011, 07:02 AM   #12
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Nice deal here:

Newegg.com - OCZ Vertex 2 OCZSSD2-2VTXE60G 2.5" 60GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

I just checked my hard drive and I'm using 35GB. 60GB would be enough for my OS.
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Old January 25th, 2011, 06:48 PM   #13
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don't bother using the SSD for anything other than boot. Mine has a read speed of 183 MB/S and a write speed of only 47 MB/S. In contrast, my 2TB Hitachi shows a read speed of 102 MB/S and a write speed of 99 MBS.

While the read speed of my SSD currently is fast, it will slow down as I load it up. I just had to wipe it clean and start re-installing all programs, and it now only has 21 GB used. That's why it's still so fast.

But where an SSD really shines is in search latency - it's almost zero. That's why booting and opening programs is so insanely fast.

I'm surprised that you have trouble with your disks being too slow to keep up with demand during preview. I admit that I, too, have that problem with Cineform 60p files - 60 fps with files created by Cineform at the High setting really test a drive. But if you're not using 60p Cineform video or other demanding format (uncompressed, Logarith, etc.), then maybe you just need to get one fast 2GB drive (about $99 a few weeks ago when I bought my last one).

If you'd like a nice 1366 mobo at an excellent price, you might want to look at the computer that I built a few months ago. I'm still happy with it - except for the RAM (get RAM that is approved by the manufacturer). Here's the link:

Sony Creative Software - Forums - Vegas Pro - Video Messages

It's true that I recently had to wipe my Drive C, but I had migrated that OS from WinXP to Win7, then from another hardware setup (an Asus P5B). And since then I had installed and uninstalled hardware cards and many programs (I had about 150 programs installed until I started over again). It all finally got to be too much for it - even though all my programs were still working well (but I could no longer uninstall programs). Unfortunately, I failed to notice the uninstall glitch before I erased the OS images that I had saved. Such is life . . .
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Old January 27th, 2011, 12:38 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Randall Leong View Post
Two questions:

1) Are you going to add a discrete PCI-e hardware RAID controller card, such as those higher-end models from Areca, in the foreseeable future?

2) If you answered "Yes to 1), then are you going to add any additional PCI-e cards to any of the PCI-e x1 slots at all?

If you answered "Yes" to both, then don't go with any of the current LGA 1155 Sandy Bridge CPUs or motherboards.
I am just days away from getting a new computer and was looking into the LGA 1155 Sandy Bridge i7 2600k CPU and Asus motherboards. I am planning on using my 2-Port eSATA PCIe Adapter Card which is hooked up to 2 Rosewill RSV-S4-X 4 Bay SATA to eSATA enclosures. They have been running fine under my Quad 6700 along with Sony Vegas.

Now not beeing so technically inclined, will this be a problem if I use my 2-Port eSATA PCIe Adapter Card with the 2 enclosures?
I am planning on getting an Asus P8P67 motherboard but just can't figure out which one to go for, while the P8P67 Deluxe might be the one sharing less bandwith at the PCIe?
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Old January 27th, 2011, 01:19 PM   #15
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The P8P67 Deluxe has eSata built in, which is what I like. A little less bandwidth? Not sure I would care. Looks like a good board. Why would your card not work? Just make sure it's software is compatible with your OS.

I would personally use the board's built in esata if I had only two esata drives. I have more, so I use add-on cards as well.

I haven't studied the board. If it checks out during your research phase, and has what you need, buy it.
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