volume control on clip at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Windows / PC Post Production Solutions > What Happens in Vegas...

What Happens in Vegas...
...stays in Vegas! This PC-based editing app is a safe bet with these tips.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old June 13th, 2007, 05:07 AM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Woomelang Australia
Posts: 14
volume control on clip

how do i change the volume on a single clip in the timeline.thanks rick
Rick Johnston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2007, 06:08 AM   #2
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
Control V will insert a Volume Envelope on the TIMELINE. Set your cursor to the beginning of the CLIP, double click to set a POINT set another one right next to it-go to the end of the CLIP and do the same-now adjust the volume envelope using the 2 INNER points OR you can add another audio track-move the clip to that and use the level control in the track header OR send the 2 different tracks to 2 different busses and use the busses to adjust the levels to the master.
Vegas will almost always give you 2 to 3 diffeent ways of doing something. Pick the one that suits you and the project best.

Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2007, 08:37 AM   #3
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Stockton, UT
Posts: 5,648
Or (on a single clip) you can place the cursor at the top of the clip, your cursor changes to a hand/finger. Click and downward drag the volume of that clip. Don's mentioned method is the best overall, but for a single clip only...this method works best, IMO.
__________________
Douglas Spotted Eagle/Spot
Author, producer, composer
Certified Sony Vegas Trainer
http://www.vasst.com
Douglas Spotted Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2007, 11:24 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 293
Well call me crazy but here's another pet peeve of mine with Vegas. (BTW - been using Vegas since ver.4) Why not have the volume adjusting line on an individual clip in the center of the event, rather than at the top. Then if you move the line up above the center point, it increases the event volume, below, it lowers the volume. Why only lower the volume on a clip level????

Volume envelopes on a track basis have their place. But what if I have 50 events and only want to change the volume on one? Creating four adjustment points on a volume envelope just to raise the volume on one clip is a pain - esp. when 9 times out of 10 those points don't travel well when you move an event (yes I have "link evelopes to events" or whatever it is selected.)
Peter J Alessandria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2007, 11:30 AM   #5
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Stockton, UT
Posts: 5,648
Because with digital audio that is recorded correctly, you rarely want to increase the gain. It's not like analog audio where you have some headroom.
On the whole, it's easily argued that you are generally pulling levels to make audio 'fit' as opposed to pushing levels.
__________________
Douglas Spotted Eagle/Spot
Author, producer, composer
Certified Sony Vegas Trainer
http://www.vasst.com
Douglas Spotted Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2007, 08:19 AM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 481
[QUOTE=Peter J Alessandria;696254]Well call me crazy but here's another pet peeve of mine with Vegas. (BTW - been using Vegas since ver.4) Why not have the volume adjusting line on an individual clip in the center of the event, rather than at the top. Then if you move the line up above the center point, it increases the event volume, below, it lowers the volume. Why only lower the volume on a clip level????

I agree Peter, it IS a pain not being able to quickly & simply INCREASE an event's level. Unfortunatley Douglass, nothing is perfect and when you have weak audio from say someone talking a bit far away or you had a clip on the fly & didn't have time to adjust levels, it is pain.
Ron Cooper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2007, 08:44 AM   #7
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Stockton, UT
Posts: 5,648
This is why you have normalization. To match the audio with other audio on the timeline.
On the other hand, if Sony gave people the option of increasing the audio to where it was constantly brickwalling, people would gripe about that, too.
The concept of 0dBFS is very foreign to many people, and as a result I'd think the developer would want to prevent them from damaging audio at every turn possible. I've seen people who author books on video completely off-track with regard to dBFS, reference levels, 0dBFS vs 0dBVU, etc. Sure, Sony *could* give you the ability to add gain...but I can see a *lot* of reasons why it shouldn't be so.
Normalize, and were it me, I'd normalize in a tool that gives me RMS vs peak normalization. That's the proper flow for situations where you've recorded poor audio.
__________________
Douglas Spotted Eagle/Spot
Author, producer, composer
Certified Sony Vegas Trainer
http://www.vasst.com
Douglas Spotted Eagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2007, 06:05 PM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas Spotted Eagle View Post
The concept of 0dBFS is very foreign to many people, and as a result I'd think the developer would want to prevent them from damaging audio at every turn possible. I've seen people who author books on video completely off-track with regard to dBFS, reference levels, 0dBFS vs 0dBVU, etc. Sure, Sony *could* give you the ability to add gain...but I can see a *lot* of reasons why it shouldn't be so.
Sorry - still doesn't make sense: following that rationale, your volume envelopes should also only go one way: down. Clearly the ability to raise volume is not placing my audio levels in immediate jeopardy.
Peter J Alessandria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2007, 12:12 AM   #9
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Raising your audio can cause clipping. That is why allowing people to raise their audio levels can be dangerous.

2- Normalization will raise your audio levels for you. It's not dangerous because it will just your audio to just before the point of clipping. The just before point is defined in the preferences.

2b- You don't necessarily want your peak hitting 0dBFS, since that can look like clipping. Vegas defaults to something slightly less than 0dBFS.

3- If you really need to add more loudness or gain, throw on some compression.



I hope that helps.

Last edited by Douglas Spotted Eagle; June 17th, 2007 at 09:22 AM. Reason: links removed
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Windows / PC Post Production Solutions > What Happens in Vegas...

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:42 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network