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-   -   Record voice etc. afterwards (program?) (https://www.dvinfo.net/forum/all-things-audio/36974-record-voice-etc-afterwards-program.html)

Michael Althaus December 27th, 2004 06:25 PM

Record voice etc. afterwards (program?)
 
hi,

I'm looking for a program to record voice and noises in sync with the already shot short film (what's the correct English word for this?). Best would be if I can play my film simultaneous while recording directly to the time line so I could check immediately after every take if the voice I just recorded is in sync with the picture.

I'm not sure if the Final Cut voice over feature is the right tool for this. What programs do "professional" sound studios use? Are there any good programs for Mac OSX?

I'm very new to audio production. We already recorded everything in a small studio but they had not the right tools so it was very complicated and I'm not satisfied with the result. That's why I want to learn something about audio production and probably try to do it by myself in this case (it's only a 1min short film).

Thanx,

Michael

Douglas Spotted Eagle December 28th, 2004 01:56 AM

Final Cut Voiceover is just fine for this. Other options are ProTools LE, Peak Bias.

Michael Althaus December 28th, 2004 09:52 AM

What bit depth and sampling rate would you choose? The final clip will be shown in movie theaters. I'm also looking for a hardware device with XLR inputs that I could connect over fire wire with my Mac. Does something like that exist?
PS: Sorry for my bad English....

Dave Frank December 29th, 2004 02:25 PM

I use a MOTU 828 soundboard to bring in audio to my mac. There are much cheaper alternatives, especially since you don't need 8 inputs. Lots of companies make these kind of products including the Edirol FA-101 and the M-Audio Firewire 410.

Pro Tools offers a program called DV Toolkit that you might want to check out.

My preference is to do ADR(Additional Dialogue Recording) in an audio program, not in Final Cut Pro or other video editing application.

Ian Corey December 31st, 2004 08:23 PM

Dave is right, for your dollar (in English that means it's right up your alley) the DV Tool kit is pretty good.
He's also not pulling your leg (that means he's not joshing you) when he says that doing your recording in a program strictly geared towards audio is a good idea. If you use a non-linear program, like protools, you'll be able to slide your voice tracks around so that, if you are off by a second in your dialog, you won't have to re-record it. You mentioned NOISES, this non-linear program would allow you the ability to collect all the sounds you need and align them to their event times. Rather than trying to make the sound happen at the perfect time 'by hand'.

Please, take these numbers and do not forget them - 16bit...okay? Got that? ... 44,100kHz sampling rate. Yes, Snaif 44 thousand and 100 samples of your audio are being recorded EVERY SECOND!! What a great place to live, right?

Again, that's 16, 44.1. Those are the sampling and bit rates for CD quality audio, which is good enough to please just about anyone who goes to movie theatres.


May the force be with you, Snaif.

Bruce S. Yarock December 31st, 2004 08:32 PM

It's best to use an audio program. I've been using Cubase and Nuendo by steinberg. Comming from a recording background, I find it useless to try to do audio in the video editing programs ( we use premiere)
good luck.
Bruce yarock

Ty Ford December 31st, 2004 08:51 PM

<<<-- Originally posted by Ian Corey : Dave is right, for your dollar (in English that means it's right up your alley) the DV Tool kit is pretty good.

Please, take these numbers and do not forget them - 16bit...okay? Got that? ... 44,100kHz sampling rate. Yes, Snaif 44 thousand and 100 samples of your audio are being recorded EVERY SECOND!! What a great place to live, right?

Again, that's 16, 44.1. Those are the sampling and bit rates for CD quality audio, which is good enough to please just about anyone who goes to movie theatres.


----Unless, of ocurse, your movie recorded the audio at 48 kHz 16 bit. In which case, you'll want to record your audio at 48 kHz, 16 bit.

Smiles,

Ty Ford

Michael Althaus January 4th, 2005 04:36 PM

I know what bit depth and sampling rate means, I just wanted to know if there's a standard for movie theaters.

Is it possible to play a movie in protools and record directly to the timeline to check right after recording if the voice is in sync with the movie (so I don't have to import the sound file into a video editing program and put it in sync to the movie by hand to check if it's good.).

Ty Ford January 4th, 2005 10:20 PM

PTLE will playback QT movies on its timeline. You can syn audio to it on another track.

PTLE requires Digidesign hardware. The least expensive is the mBox. PTLE and the mBox list for $499 (I think).

Regards,

Ty Ford

Michael Althaus January 6th, 2005 02:41 AM

Looks good to me and the price is ok too. Thanx for all your help....

Regards,

Michael


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