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-   -   Adobe Audition: live monitoring (https://www.dvinfo.net/forum/all-things-audio/49681-adobe-audition-live-monitoring.html)

Russ Lamkin August 21st, 2005 06:13 AM

Adobe Audition: live monitoring
 
Does anyone know if Adobe Audition (1.5) can do live input monitoring?

Ultimately, what I'm looking to do is allow a singer to monitor (via headphones) their live-voice and the music layed out on the other tracks while they record.

Here's my setup: WinXP PC with an Audiophile 2496 sound card. I'm running the stereo outs from a Peavey RQ 200 6 channel mixer into the sound cards RCA stereo inputs. From there, I run the RCA output from the sound card into my Logitech Z560 4.1 Computer Speakers.

The M-Audio Delta Control Panel utility that came with the sound card has several options in the Patchbay/Router tab which allows me to monitor my microphone input over the speakers (the H/W In 1/2 option) however, I can no longer monitor sounds generated from the PC when I select it. So, I set it back to WavOut 1/2, but can no longer monitor my mic over the speakers.

If Adobe Audition doesnt support live monitoring, then my only option is to run my sound card RCA outs back into my mixer, then plug the headphones into the 'monitor out' of the mixer. After that, I could route my mic level to the headphone/monitor channel via the 'monitor out' on the mic channel. However, I still can't monitor any live-effects that I add to the mic through Audition, like reverb.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Steve House August 21st, 2005 09:42 AM

Whe you say "monitor sounds generated by my PC" are you talking about Windows' bleeps, sweeps, and creeps like "You Have Mail"? If so, you might want to reconsider monitoring them at all. The reason is that most of the Windows system sounds are recorded at 22kHz or even as low as 11 kHz sample rates. I won't swear to the Audiophile card doing this, but many interfaces will automatically set their sample rate to the lowest rate going through them. That means that if you're in the middle of a high qualiy, at say 48kHz or 96 kHz, recording session and Windows plays a system bleep, suddenly your sample rate will plummet in mid stream, not a good thing. For this reason at least one vendor (Echo Audio) recommends disabling the Windows system sounds completely. Or, if you really do want to hear them, adding an el-cheapo $20 basic sound card to the system alongside your good interface and make it the default wave playback device. Monitor the recording session throught your headphones or good speakers on the Audiophile's outputs while the WinBleeps play through cheap speakers connected to the 2nd card.

Russ Lamkin August 21st, 2005 03:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve House
When you say "monitor sounds generated by my PC" are you talking about Windows' bleeps, sweeps, and creeps like "You Have Mail"?

I meant ALL sounds, from the recorded music tracks in Audition to... well, everything. Sorry for the confusion.

Basically, the sound card utility program allows me to monitor my input signal (from the RCA in's) , but in doing so, all you can monitor is your input signal and nothing else.

With my old sound card (soundblaster) I was able to check the microphone mute on/off from the windows sound device properties, however, the new Audiophile card (once installed) removes that from the list of available devices. Weird, eh?

My real concern is if Audition can even do live-monitoring or not. I may be fishing for red herrings.

Steve House August 22nd, 2005 04:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Russ Lamkin
I meant ALL sounds, from the recorded music tracks in Audition to... well, everything. Sorry for the confusion.

Basically, the sound card utility program allows me to monitor my input signal (from the RCA in's) , but in doing so, all you can monitor is your input signal and nothing else.

With my old sound card (soundblaster) I was able to check the microphone mute on/off from the windows sound device properties, however, the new Audiophile card (once installed) removes that from the list of available devices. Weird, eh?

My real concern is if Audition can even do live-monitoring or not. I may be fishing for red herrings.

I'm confused. Just guessing here as I'm not an Audition user nor do I have that soundcard. I didn't think the Audiophile 2496 had mic inputs so that's why they wouldn't be there to monitor. And I was under the impression that when you recorded the original tracks in Audition, they were recorded without effects unless you added them in the analog domain before sending the signal to your soundcard. Audition's effects are added to the master tracks later during editing and rendering and so they wouldn't be there to monitor as you laid down the master tracks.

Roger Averdahl August 22nd, 2005 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Russ Lamkin
Does anyone know if Adobe Audition (1.5) can do live input monitoring?

If i understand your cuestion right you can do it by doing this:

- Press Alt+7 to display the Level Meters (You problably have them displayed already?)
- Right click with your mouse on the Level Meters and choose Monitor Record Level

You have to do this every time you open Audition. Audition do not "remember" this setting.

/Roger

Stephen Finton August 22nd, 2005 12:22 PM

I think what he meant was that he wanted the singer to be able to be recorded while the other tracks just play back through to her headphones.

The answer is YES but... you have to have a hard drive fast enough to play back and record to at the same time.

The process that you are speaking of is an integral part of multitracking, in the first place. There would be no reason for a multitrack environment, if it could not do this.

If you need instructions:

You'll notice the MUTE, SOLO, and RECORD buttons next to each track. Hit RECORD on the track you intend to record your vocalist on. The tracks you are playing back, do nothing to. They should playback while you record. You may have to assign them to your right or left channel of your soundcard's output, if you want to hear them seperate from the voice that is being recorded. Send the voice to the other channel. You can mixdown to stereo later.

You may need an adapter that will split your soundcard's output to seperate channels, too. Then you can hook up the vocalist's headphones to the output of your playback tracks and they will not be distracted by hearing their own voice coming out of the headphones a milisecond later.

In other words, get thee to Radio Shack!

Russ Lamkin September 1st, 2005 04:42 PM

solution
 
I figured out how to configure my M Audio Delta Control Panel to so I can monitor my mic input and recorded tracks simletaneiously.

For anyone else who's struggled with this, I'll write a quick run-down of how to do this.

In the Patchbay/Router tab set your "H/W Out 1/2" to Monitor Mixer. This will route all input/output signals through the Delta softwares mixer. From the Monitor Mixer tab, you now have the ability to adjust levels for Wav Outs and H/W In's. Make sure your sliders are up and the channels are not muted.

Now, your singer should hear their voice coming thru the microphone as they sing along with recorded tracks in Audition. Unfortunealy, there is no way to put 'live effects' on their mic with Audition, so all they're going to hear is a 'dry' mic. However, most singer prefer to hear themselves in the headphones while singing along with the music, so at least they got that! :)


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