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-   -   Which wireless freq range? (https://www.dvinfo.net/forum/all-things-audio/63398-wireless-freq-range.html)

Bruce Marusich March 21st, 2006 12:16 PM

Which wireless freq range?
 
I am planning to purchase a sennheiser G2 wireless mic/rec bundle to use with my XL1s for a wedding. The church uses freq range "C" in the main room. I do different events at different locales, so my question is: which frequency range, A, B, or C is generally considered the best choice when dealing with different venues and their different setups? I wouldn't want to have to get sets for each range. I understand the the G2 series is agile, would that cover all bases? Would one range be enough, and if so, which one?
Thanks,
Bruce Marusich

Steve House March 21st, 2006 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bruce Marusich
I am planning to purchase a sennheiser G2 wireless mic/rec bundle to use with my XL1s for a wedding. The church uses freq range "C" in the main room. I do different events at different locales, so my question is: which frequency range, A, B, or C is generally considered the best choice when dealing with different venues and their different setups? I wouldn't want to have to get sets for each range. I understand the the G2 series is agile, would that cover all bases? Would one range be enough, and if so, which one?
Thanks,
Bruce Marusich

Your first decision point should be based on the frequency range with the least amount of potential interference from TV stations, etc, in the area. There's a frequency finder application on the Sennheiser website that's a start but I understand it's not very accurate or up to date. Visit a pro audio dealer in your area and discuss their frequency recommendations.

John DeLuca March 28th, 2006 05:28 PM

I have heard A channel is best, but most crowded. If your using UHF, you should be fine...... The new G2 units have "auto scan" as an upgrade from the older units.

-John

Shawn Redford March 29th, 2006 04:27 AM

Okay, the quick and easy was is to take a look at this link and pick your state, then look for your city:
http://www.sennheiserusa.com/newsite...qfinder-ew.asp

However, as noted already, the Sennheiser list is not up to date. To be certain of the channels broadcast in your area, you need to check all the UHF channels used by both analog and digital TV broadcasts that might interfere with the Sennheiser A, B, or C. This means you'll need an analog/digital TV:
A - 518-554Mhz - UHF TV Channels 22-27
B - 626-662Mhz - UHF TV Channels 40-45
C - 740-776Mhz - UHF TV Channels 59-64

When checking analog, this is pretty easy since you can use any old analog TV's NTSC tuner and it's also easy because each analog channel corresponds to the actual channel number.

Digital over-the-air (OTA) channels are harder to check if you don't have the gear. First of all, you need some sort of Digital OTA Tuner which is technically an ATSC tuner (a cable QAM tuner is different). ATSC Tuners are sometimes built into digital televisions, but more often you need an HDTV OTA Tuner (technically an ATSC Set-Top-Box). Another option is a OTA tuner card/box that works with your computer (such as the FusionHDTV from www.dvico.com). The bottom line is that you have to find some way to receive digital OTA channels - maybe a store will help you out. Once you have this ability, you can have the tuner scan for the digital broadcasts in your area.

The trick with Digital TV is that the Digital Channel Number does not correspond to the UHF channel used. For example, in Los Angeles, Digital 2 (D2) is CBS but this is broadcast on UHF channel 60 (this is done so that viewers who watch CBS's analog Ch2 can easily remember that D2 is the digital counterpart). The important thing is that the software for the Dvico tuner allows you to see each digital channel's corresponding UHF channel. You can sort through this to see the various UHF channels that are taken up by digital broadcasts. So here is an example:

Sennheiser A - 518-554Mhz - UHF TV Channels 22-27
For Los Angeles:
22-analog (KWHY)
!23=D40(Digital KTBN) **(NOT ON Senn. LA List)**
24=analog (KVCR)
25 (Listed as Low Power on Senn. LA List-I get no reception)
26=D24(Digital KVCR)
!27-analog **(NOT ON Senn. LA List)**

So, every TV channel is taken up for Sennheiser A, but since channel 25 is low power, I might be able to use the Sennheiser A in that spectrum. Notice also, that UHF ch. 23 & 27 are not on the Sennheiser listing - that's why it is important to check it yourself. By also checking Sennheiser B and Sennheiser C, you can determine which one has the fewest channels already taken up. Also, note that there is some legislation listed on Sennheiser's web page which may make further restrict the Sennheiser C in the USA.

Finally, it's important to keep in mind that the FCC is eventually mandating that all VHF broadcasts stop, so if you have folks broadcasting on channels 2-13 in your area and they do NOT have a digital broadcast, they are going to need an open UHF channel at some point. I think the FCC is also mandating that all broadcast must become digital, and if that's true, then some of those analog channels will drop out. The bottom line is that we're in a state of flux, but you can probably bet that the existing digital channels will stay put.

So that's the long answer ;)

Douglas Spotted Eagle March 29th, 2006 08:24 AM

I'll give you the short answer; Flip a quarter. It's easily as accurate.
Seriously, the main reason other cheaper and more expensive, lesser quality and greater quality manufacturers of wireless' won't go as far as Senn has, is because they all know it's more or less a farce. You can pick a reasonably broad range for a given geography, but that's as far as it gets.


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