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Dan Holly June 26th, 2003 12:36 PM

John
 
I agree, and looking back at my post it seems a little dry.

Culture has always been a touchy thing for international companies.

On the other side of the coin, I'm wondering how well the workers in Japan are adapted to the "american way" when it comes to job cuts with a US based/owned company.

In this case it didn't seem to go over very well, but do you have any insight for the overall picture?

Joseph George June 26th, 2003 01:40 PM

If a company does not adopt to the local culture, it will fail. You can't use Japanesse personnel methods in the US and you can't use US methods in Japan. Lunchbox is an absolute failure in Japan. In addition billy did not want to pay a Japanese firm for some of the development they did for the Lunchbox and until now he ows them $. He decided not to pay and was going to hire another Japanese company for Lunchbox2 development. Then he realized that the 1st company has all the expertise, so he's back with them, paying them everything that he owes. None of this sits well with the Japanese. There are 2 kinds of people -- the ones who kiss up to billy, admire him, and call him Uncle Bill, and the ones who know the reaity. If you are into making movies and video, and you're an artist, you most likely belong to the 2nd category. If you make movies and videos and and you're a salesman, you most likely belong to the 1st category. Plus there are the ones who do not know because they don't care about computers and ones who don't have the brains to make correct decision. Just hearing opinion of someone in this industry on Bill Gates will tell you a lot about that person.

Keith Loh June 26th, 2003 01:46 PM

<<<-- Originally posted by Joseph George : If There are 2 kinds of people -- the ones who kiss up to billy, admire him, and call him Uncle Bill, and the ones who know the reaity. If you are into making movies and video, and you're an artist, you most likely belong to the 2nd category. If you make movies and videos and and you're a salesman, you most likely belong to the 1st category. Plus there are the ones who do not know because they don't care about computers and ones who don't have the brains to make correct decision. Just hearing opinion of someone in this industry on Bill Gates will tell you a lot about that person. -->>>

Only two kinds of people, George? You sure about that?

Joseph George June 26th, 2003 02:13 PM

That's right. The gills that like the boys and the boys that like the girls, except in this town half of them are confused a lot and that creates two more categories. Hey Keith, don't take my posts too seriously. I don't.

Michael Westphal June 26th, 2003 03:49 PM

10 types of people
 
I thought there were actually 10 types of people.

Those who understand Binary

And those who don't.


;-)

Joseph George June 26th, 2003 07:22 PM

hoo is sheeee? hooooooo is Binary? Sheeeeeee cute? Anyway, going to a great party, then the entertainment technology expo, then again flying away. Have a goodwhatever. If Binary cute, ship her heeeer. I don't have to understand her as long as we understand each other.

John Locke June 26th, 2003 09:16 PM

Dan,

As you know, the "unofficial" international business standards, methods, and protocol are dominated by the U.S. way of doing business simply because it's the biggest market in the world by far.

Over here, they tend to divide their businesses into two sectors...international and domestic (not simply in an operational sense)...and the differences are night and day. Products are deliberately "localized" to prevent outside competitors from easily entering the market (for instance, you can't buy printer cartridges for an Epson printer bought in the States and carried over here because they've changed them slightly to ensure they don't fit...and Epson is a Japanese company!). So, the attitude is definitely "US" vs. "them" (notice the difference in capitalization).

But even though xenophobia still reigns supreme all over Asia, reality is starting to sink in. Japan has been in a recession for over a decade now and one of the main reasons for this is the conflict between Japanese societal culture and business culture--business culture that more and more is becoming international even down to the "Mom and Pop" business level. Because of that, the divisions between the international and domestic branches of companies are starting to break down (out of necessity)...and this is causing adjustment problems. Recently, a major company over here swapped the employees of their international division with their domestic division...can you imagine that? They flip-flopped the whole thing just to try to breakdown the US vs. them mental barrier and to get people thinking globally rather than huddling in a corner guarding what's theirs.

So...realization is here, but I think it'll take a long time to work out all the conflicts that are required. For instance, in the U.S., the strongest/smartest/most efficient way wins out, simply because that's the way to make money. And it doesn't matter if the idea comes from a top engineer/executive or a clerk in the mailroom. Over here, a younger person wouldn't be able to outshine his older, more accomplished colleague in a higher position...that just isn't done. So, innovation and motivation are squashed.

There's also the mindset here that no one wants to try something different until one influential person/company has the guts to try it...and if they're successful, everyone floods the gates trying to do the same thing. Change doesn't come easily here. I think it's so funny that everywhere you look here...and I mean everywhere...all you see are brown, long-haired miniature dachsunds. Why? Because that's the pet everyone else has now.

But that's not to say the "American Way" is the best way. It's proven itself to be the way to make money... but Japan has a rich culture and some practices that are very refreshing compared to other cultures. I imagine Japan will eventually come up with a way to compete full-force in the international market (and when that happens, look out!) while still retaining the best of their timeless traditions. I hope that's the case.

Dan Holly June 27th, 2003 01:01 AM

John,

Thanks for taking the time to give us the inside view.

Very interesting to say the least.

The "brown, long-haired miniature dachsunds" adds an interesting twist.


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