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-   Sony TRV950 / PDX10 Companion (https://www.dvinfo.net/forum/sony-trv950-pdx10-companion/)
-   -   HC1000 -- various questions (https://www.dvinfo.net/forum/sony-trv950-pdx10-companion/30692-hc1000-various-questions.html)

Boyd Ostroff June 8th, 2005 01:41 PM

See this thread, especially Lamar's explanation. Every prosumer camcorder works like this. The lens is slower at the telephoto end of the zoom. For some unknown reason the data code is correct in auto mode, but it lies in manual...

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthread.php?t=37526

Stephen Finton June 8th, 2005 02:22 PM

Maybe it "knows" the exposure setting I set it to in manual but does not calculate the added f-stop of the lens in full tele? I guess this would be the difference between it and the TRV950. They did miniaturize it even further...

Stephen Finton June 8th, 2005 03:06 PM

I'll be quiet now. I think I have broken my brain to fit into SONY's mold now. I understand. I guess I was just expecting to buy something that would allow me to screw up the video, if I didn't know what I was doing. I don't mind having my hand held with sweet spots.

Stephen Finton June 8th, 2005 10:35 PM

I can see the IR light of the remote!
 
I was plaing with an older remote, pointing it at the HC1000 to see if it would work and I could see the IR LED on the remote light up a very obvious red! I tried seeing it with my naked eye but I couldn't!

Tom Hardwick June 9th, 2005 12:13 AM

Sorry to hear about the brain ache Stephen, but even so you now see clearly. Nobody's pulling your leg and yes - use the 1000 in auto and you won't go far wrong. Having asked the camera what it thinks the settings should be, *then* lock those settings for the shot. It's those that fiddle with the settings that get into the CCD smear and diffraction modes, whereas the camera designers have gone to great lengths to help you avoid these nasties.

tom.

Kyle Ringin June 9th, 2005 12:34 AM

Most CCDs (and maybe CMOS too?) sensors are sensative to IR light, that's why the IR LED illuminators work on those security cameras. Human eyes can't see that wavelength.

Goldfish are the only animal that can see both IR and UV light (I heard), so you could also try pointing the remote at a fish. Don't know what that would prove though...

Stephen Finton June 9th, 2005 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kyle Ringin
Most CCDs (and maybe CMOS too?) sensors are sensative to IR light, that's why the IR LED illuminators work on those security cameras. Human eyes can't see that wavelength.

Goldfish are the only animal that can see both IR and UV light (I heard), so you could also try pointing the remote at a fish. Don't know what that would prove though...


Prolly make it float on its back. :)

Stephen Finton June 9th, 2005 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Hardwick
Sorry to hear about the brain ache Stephen, but even so you now see clearly. Nobody's pulling your leg and yes - use the 1000 in auto and you won't go far wrong. Having asked the camera what it thinks the settings should be, *then* lock those settings for the shot. It's those that fiddle with the settings that get into the CCD smear and diffraction modes, whereas the camera designers have gone to great lengths to help you avoid these nasties.

tom.

So AUTO LOCK is for locking AUTO settings when in the ON position? I'm at work right now so I cannot confirm but I thought turning on AUTO LOCK put the camera in AUTO on all settings that can be controlled by the camera. I seemed to be able to use this to switch between auto mode and manual, with the manual settings remaining the same when I switch back to them.

So I guess my question is, how do I lock down my auto settings once the camera has selected them?

Tom Hardwick June 9th, 2005 09:02 AM

I'm going to have to assume that the HC1000 has a little three-position slider like its forefathers. This is marked Auto lock, then -, then Hold.

In the auto lock position everything's on automatic except the focus. You can still zoom of course and use the backlight and spotlight modes.

If you slide that slider to the middle position it *locks in* the auto settings the camera has chosen at that precise moment. It's locked the w'bal, s'speed and aperture but now allows you to vary any one or all of them.

If you then slide it to Hold it disables the buttons that give you access to these parameters - just like the hold button on a Walkman that disables the transport controls so you can skateboard without changing track.

To ask the camera for new advice, simply go back to Auto lock and then immediately back to the centre position. There, you've locked in a whole set of new parameters.

tom.

Boyd Ostroff June 9th, 2005 09:27 AM

There was an interesting article a couple months ago in Fortune Magazine. There are actually a number of people that can see IR light as well. For the most part, they're people who have had eye injuries and corrective surgery. Also some people who have operations for glaucoma IIRC.

Stephen Finton June 9th, 2005 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Hardwick
I'm going to have to assume that the HC1000 has a little three-position slider like its forefathers. This is marked Auto lock, then -, then Hold.

In the auto lock position everything's on automatic except the focus. You can still zoom of course and use the backlight and spotlight modes.

If you slide that slider to the middle position it *locks in* the auto settings the camera has chosen at that precise moment. It's locked the w'bal, s'speed and aperture but now allows you to vary any one or all of them.

If you then slide it to Hold it disables the buttons that give you access to these parameters - just like the hold button on a Walkman that disables the transport controls so you can skateboard without changing track.

To ask the camera for new advice, simply go back to Auto lock and then immediately back to the centre position. There, you've locked in a whole set of new parameters.

tom.

It is 2-position. Either ON or OFF. No HOLD.

I don't think I've ever tried setting my camera for AUTO mode and then using the AUTO LOCK because when the camera is in MANUAL, AUTO LOCK->ON switches it to AUTO. AUTO LOCK->OFF switches it back to your original MANUAL settings. I will try setting the camera to auto in the menus and then switching AUTO LOCK to ON. This should lock what the camera has selected.

The HOLD setting is not there because there are hardly any manual buttons on the HC1000 to begin with.

Tom Hardwick June 9th, 2005 11:17 AM

I'm beginning to wonder if you bought the right cam. : -) An FX1 sounds right up your street Steve.

Stephen Finton June 9th, 2005 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Hardwick
I'm beginning to wonder if you bought the right cam. : -) An FX1 sounds right up your street Steve.

My alley is in the poor part of town.

And besides, for all that HDV delivers, it's long GOP encoding is frightful. At 1080i it's 15 frames per GOP! That's 1/2 second that is lost everytime you have a a glitch on the tape!

Stephen Finton June 9th, 2005 03:03 PM

HC1000 LCD Backlight Button
 
I really like that there is a button to turn on and off the backlight for the LCD on the HC1000. I find I do not need a LCD hood yet because of it. It's right there on the edge of the screen, too! I was outside in very bright sunlight and was having trouble making out what I was looking at when I turned off the backlight and used the sunlight to light the screen!

Stephen Finton June 12th, 2005 11:10 PM

Really Liking the HC1000 now!
 
We shot on two seperate nights the same singer with the HC1000. "Very nice" is all I have to say. I will have to post clips but I am homeless in this vast cyberland.

Stephen Finton June 13th, 2005 11:17 PM

Here is the HC1000's manual.
 
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/re...&append-uid=no

Boyd Ostroff June 14th, 2005 06:53 AM

Thanks Stephen, I'm turning this thread into a "sticky" so it will appear at the top of the page.

Stephen Finton June 14th, 2005 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Boyd Ostroff
Thanks Stephen, I'm turning this thread into a "sticky" so it will appear at the top of the page.

I knew you would. :)

Stephen Finton June 27th, 2005 09:27 AM

HC1000 surround mic question
 
Can you mix what you record with higher rez audio and then run it through Click To DVD or are you stuck with what you recorded onto tape? I'm guessing this mic won't be worth getting, if SONY doesn't let you add 48kHz audio to it later.

Is there any other way to extract 4-channel audio from a 12-bit DV audio stream or does the DV standard only consider it 2-channel, with an overdub mix on all other software out there?

Jay Donalds July 22nd, 2005 06:58 PM

To Hc1000 Or Not To Hc1000, That Is The Question
 
Hello Everybody!
This is my 1st time posting, been a reader for a while but this time I could use some feedback. I have the opportunity to purchase a HC1000 that's basically only been looked at, not even used for about $500 less than the B&H price. I read a review on camcorderinfo.net and they slammed it pretty hard, mainly on the touchscreen issue, but I'm sure many of you read they're review. I've been working on a couple projects borrowing a friends GL2, would like to get a cam to finish up a reality-documentry, and also use for other projects like it. My friend who has the GL2 and I have thought about teaming up to offer low budget event coverage to pay the bills. I figured the camera would be alot less intrusive that my friends GL2, and would make a good B CAM any work for hire we do. Anybody have any advice if the HC1000 at that price is a good way for me to go?

Boyd Ostroff July 22nd, 2005 07:08 PM

Hi Jay and welcome to DVinfo! What is the price for the HC-1000? We have discussed it here on and off, and it seems to have its plusses and minuses. Just off the top of my head....

GOOD:
Real, high quality 16:9
Nice form factor

BAD:
Manual controls moved to touchscreen
LCD panel smaller than TRV-950/PDX-10
Uses small internal battery

Steve Finton is the only regular around here that I know who has an HC-1000. Maybe he'll offer an opinion. Here are some of his posts:

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/search.php?searchid=68476

Carlos E. Martinez July 23rd, 2005 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Boyd Ostroff
GOOD:
Real, high quality 16:9
Nice form factor

BAD:
Manual controls moved to touchscreen
LCD panel smaller than TRV-950/PDX-10
Uses small internal battery

It is also a 1-CCD camera, right?


Carlos

Jim Ohair July 23rd, 2005 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carlos E. Martinez
It is also a 1-CCD camera, right?


Carlos

I think the hc1000 has the same or similar ccd's as the pdx-10
The footage this camera will take should be fantastic.

Boyd Ostroff July 23rd, 2005 06:08 PM

The HC-1000 has the same three 1/4.7" CCD's and optics as the TRV-950 and PDX-10. It improved over the TRV-950 by offering the same hi-res 16:9 mode as the PDX-10 (the TRV-950 was intentionally crippled in firmware to produce lower quality 16:9). This was a step in the right direction, but unfortunately Sony made the HC-1000 more "consumery" with an internal battery of limited capacity, a smaller touchscreen, and elimation of physical controls.

Here's some more info from B&H's website, their current price is $1,400. Jay, if you can buy one in "like new" condition for $900 (as you suggest) then it might be worth considering as long as this limitations don't bother you.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ughType=search

Sandra Warshaw July 24th, 2005 08:52 PM

Flickering/shimmering/spiraling problems w new HC1000
 
I just purchased a HC1000 after tons of research.

First day out...videotaped a scene on local boardwalk along the bay.

When came back, found that there was a distracting spiral effect throughout.

It looks something like old-fashioned barbershop poles.

Colors--distinct pink/purplish hue. Other color--bluish, green.

It's primary found on thin vertical objects...especially poles--like sign and lamp posts along the boardwalk, the ships' masts. Plus other vertical segments. Not just on boardwalk...but on store fronts.

(Tried it out in another location (ocean scene) no problem. Tried again two days later, same problem. Called Sony. Sony recommended resetting camera. That didn't help at all.)

At first I thought it was on the places where sunlight most shined. But...not sure. It seems like it's where there's a streak of light along a darker area...like where there's a lamp post that is reflecting light...but is dark in color.

I'm very concerned because I have not read about the problem on various forums. So, I don't know if it's the result of a defective camera that needs to be returned or fixed. Or is there some principle at work...that requires adjustment...when shooting, composing shot, settings, editing, or other.

On another forum, I was asked how I was viewing. Below are more details. The flickering appeared on all my TV monitors. Plus when outputting from computer program (after capturing/saving clip) to TV set.

I've tried making adjustments with editing program (Premiere)...but so far no success.

I would GREATLY!!! appreciate any ideas on how to best proceed. I have about one more day left when I may be able to return to dealer. Then, it's a question of sending it back to Sony. So, that's why I hope others may share their experiences...ideas...on solutions.

THANKS in advance for any suggestions/insights.

Sandra




VIEWED ON

9" Panasonic PV-C921...flickering.
14 inch TV--same problem
Professional level monitor (JVC TM 55OU)--limited problem.
Computer screen (IBM P50)--some flickering...but not distracting.

WHEN OUTPUT segment from computer (Premiere) to TV, it also showed same level of flickering.

Boyd Ostroff July 24th, 2005 09:03 PM

I know it's a drag with a brand new camera, but send it back, either for replacement or repair depending on the policy of your vendor. I can't think of any reason why you would have this problem with a good camera.

Just one other test you might try to localize the problem. Connect the camera to your computer via firewire and catch/capture as you film a little. Do you see the same problem on the direct firewire connection as you see on the tape that's recorded? This might narrow it down to a problem with the tape transport or even the tapes themselves.

Carlos E. Martinez July 25th, 2005 07:50 AM

Sorry, got confused with HC1, which is a 1-CCD/CMOS HDV camera.

When I bought my PDX10 at B&H I also evaluated the HC1000, but it was not as good for handling or solid looking as the PDX10.

The only one who challenged the PDX10 was the Panasonic DVC30, but it had inferior 16:9 and no XLRs at that price range.


Carlos

Sandra Warshaw July 25th, 2005 11:02 AM

THANKS!!!! Boyd for taking time to consider my problem.

I believe I've made every reasonable effort to find a solution.

But...you know how it is...was reluctant to take the step of returning it.

But...this morning...reached the decision...that probably what I needed to do was exchange it...but still felt a little uncertain.

Your entry helped to give me the extra certainty and confidence.

So, that's exactly what I've proceeded to do. I called the store...and have started the process of returning/exchanging it. I know it helped when I spoke with the store representative..that I sounded certain about my decision.

I tend to be wishy...then washy.

Your entry really helped! So....much appreciation!!!

Sandra Warshaw

Jay Donalds July 25th, 2005 04:59 PM

To Hc1000 Or Not To Hc1000,
 
Thank you very much to all those who responded. I feel much better about going forward and picking up the camera.

Jay

Jeff S Smith July 25th, 2005 05:24 PM

Boyd often has good advice. Sending it back is the safe way to go.

Stephen Finton July 26th, 2005 07:52 AM

I just had a guy, that's been in the broadcast business for 30 years, borrow one of my HC1000s for a film that he will be working on until saturday. He usually uses an XL1 but I recently filmed a short with some friends of mine and he seemed to be impressed enough by the image quality to lay his XL1 aside. It made me feel good because we've always been borrowing equipment from him.

Jay Donalds July 26th, 2005 12:28 PM

To Hc1000 Or Not To Hc1000, That Is The Question
 
Again, thanks to all but I have to give special thanks to Mr.Finton. That's the kinda stuff I'm trying to hear. Keep it come'n ya'll, more REAL WORLD STORIES about the HC1000 good or bad.

Jay

Tom Hardwick July 27th, 2005 12:12 AM

It's the internal battery that kills this camera stone dead for me. Panasonic made the same design error with their DX100 back in 1998, though they corrected this when the replacement MX300 came out. So how could Sony fall into the same trap?

tom.

Stephen Finton July 27th, 2005 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Hardwick
It's the internal battery that kills this camera stone dead for me. Panasonic made the same design error with their DX100 back in 1998, though they corrected this when the replacement MX300 came out. So how could Sony fall into the same trap?

tom.

The F-Type battery that is used was for MicroMV cameras, initially. Nobody bought a MicroMV that I know of so SONY's got all these batteries laying around. From handling the camera, I don't think an external battery would have thrown off its balance.

I get 135mins with the LCD open and I've heard people say that the Panasonic GS400 DU21 battery only lasts up to 90mins with the LCD open. I think that the LCD itself has something to do with the power drain difference. The GS400 has a 3.5' and the HC1000 has a 2.5".

Sandra Warshaw July 27th, 2005 12:24 PM

Warranty Issues for Sony HC1000
 
Hi Jay,

I was considering purchasing a brand new/factory sealed HC1000 (at a lesser price) over e-bay from sellers that look dependable. One even offered a money-back guarantee.

So, will share some information that influenced my decision.

I spoke with SONY twice and was informed...

The warranty ONLY applies to SONY cameras purchased from a dealer.
The Warranty is confusing...and seems to imply it would apply to a second owner. But they were ADAMANT that it will not. (I think it's the "as is" part of the warranty that means it won't apply to second buyers.)

Plus, MACK WARRANTY can only be purchased for a camera bought from a dealer. But, (go figure), you can have an already-purchased MACK WARRANTY transferred to a second buyer...for a fee.

I know it's a BIG difference in price...and the $900 model may be problem-free.

Realize there are always a lot of factors that go into a decision...

Also not sure if this info applies to your situation...or if the purchase has been made. But wanted to share it...in case helpful.


Good luck with your HC1000. I look forward to hearing how you like it.

Sandra

PS. As you might have read...mine did arrive with problems. So far, B&H has been great about exchanging it. At least...it's on its way back to them...even as we speak. I'll keep you posted. AND...I'm assuming you'll have better luck getting a good camera. So, not intending to burst your bubble... AND I TOTALLY understand if it works better to purchase the $900 model.

Ronald Lee July 29th, 2005 01:33 PM

Is the HC1000 the same as the HC1?

Anyhow, I read that same review that slammed it. Boyd's points are on the money, the cons are reasons why Sony shot itself in the foot.

That and that HDV is unusable to pro applications right now because of the mpeg2. BUT I HOPE (Please, please, please) solutions to that come out at the end of the year.

I'm still shooting miniDV/DVCAM because of the HDV cons. When it looks like the HDV cons may be fixed, the DVX2000 on P2 may be out and that may be the one to get.

Tom Hardwick July 29th, 2005 01:39 PM

I agree, getting away from tape is the way to go. But a 60 minute, 13 gB tape for a couple of dollars is a whole world away from solid state memory. Prices will drop, but for now, tape is king.

Boyd Ostroff July 29th, 2005 01:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ronald Ng
Is the HC1000 the same as the HC1?

Nope, not even close. Thanks Sony for giving us such confusing model numbers! ;-)

The HC-1000 is a repackaging of the TRV-950. It has three 1/4.7" CCD's and doesn't shoot HDV. The HC1 is a small single chip HDV camera.

Boyd Ostroff August 3rd, 2005 03:30 PM

I was just reading a thread about the HC-1 where Stu Holmes mentioned that you can't really control exposure and shutter speed manually, and this was similar to the HC-1000. So I looked at the PDF of the HC-1000 manual and was surprised to find this was true. I didn't know that!

Evidently if you set manual shutter speed you can't control iris or gain manually. If you choose manual exposure control you can't choose the shutter speed. It's really too bad the way Sony has "dumbed down" this camera in the progression from TRV-900 to TRV-950 to HC-1000, but that may very well be what consumers want.

Sandra Warshaw August 3rd, 2005 04:36 PM

Which Lenses Best To Reduce Glare?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Boyd Ostroff
I've shot out in the sun with an NDx8 screw-in filter and needed to raise the shutter speed to get a good exposure.

In a recent entry, the NDx8 filter was recommended to reduce glare.

Which other ones would be good choices to reduce glare with the HC1000 (or companion cameras)?

My new HC1000 is on the way...and would like to be prepared to address the documented exposure challenges...described here.

I realize there are articles (web and otherwise) about best lenses for specific uses. But, continue to find I learn more from the entries here...from people using the specific camera (HC1000)(and its companions) that I'm purchasing.

Thanks in advance for taking time to respond. ALL responses help.... to understand potential, limitations and best ways to meet challenges of the camera.


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