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-   -   Broadcast Monitor Recommendations (https://www.dvinfo.net/forum/view-video-display-hardware-software/39193-broadcast-monitor-recommendations.html)

John Cloy February 9th, 2005 11:52 PM

Broadcast Monitor Recommendations
 
I'm slowly upgrading my equipment as my profit level permits. I currently use a Sony 950 & PDX10 for my shoots and Vegas 5/DVDA2 for post.

I have started to think hard about a broadcast monitor and was wondering if anyone had any recommendations?

A quick review of B&H shows a significant price difference between firewire capable monitors and those that are only S-video/composite. Is it worth it to get a firewire capable monitor or will I be just as happy with a pass through to S-video?

I don't currently have a standalone mini-DV deck (also on my wish list) so if I go the route of S-video then I'll need something in the middle to convert from firewire to S-video.

I did a search on "broadcast monitor" and "reference monitor" and didn't find much in the way of specific recommendations.

Anybody got one they really love?

Thanks in advance!
jc

Gary Kleiner February 10th, 2005 01:13 AM

What's your budget?

Gary

Rob Lohman February 10th, 2005 05:38 AM

Since this has nothing to do with Vegas I've moved the thread
to our general forum. Also see the following thread:

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthrea...threadid=39046

Do a search on the boards as well, the topic has been discussed
before!

John Cloy February 10th, 2005 08:41 AM

Hi Rob,

I *did* do a search under broadcast monitor, production monitor, & monitor (and learned alot about audio monitors - but that's another topic). If anybody knows any better searchs, I'll get on 'em - I have a feeling this must be already here somewhere and I just can't find it.

Thanks for moving this to a more appropriate spot.

Gary - I'd like to stay in the $1K range, but could range all the way up to $2K if necessary (those studio audio monitors will just have to wait).

Thanks,
jc

Ian Thomas February 13th, 2005 01:48 PM

John

How do you like your pdx10 and what do you shoot with it.

Glenn Chan February 13th, 2005 03:05 PM

One angle you can take is to look at what you're going to use your monitor for.

Having a monitor for the director + DOP + boom op/sound:
You don't need anything fancy or particularly expensive. Light weight and bigger screen size would be good (i.e. LCD are both... both there's the viewing angle issue which may not be that bad).

Having a monitor for color correction:
If monitoring colors is critical, look for a high end monitor with SMPTE C phosphors.
Ikegami and Sony make these... JVC has discontinued models which you can pick up for cheap. Do not buy used! (Unless you get to run test images through the monitor... used monitors can have a wide range of problems.)

A step down from that would be a NTSC monitor that's CRT and not LCD.

If you want a monitor for your studio too, a small/mid-size NTSC monitor with SMPTE C phosphors can work. Smaller CRTs are lighter of course (and CRTs weigh a lot).

Having a monitor for checking focus (i.e. steadicam):
Black and white CRTs tend to have greater resolution than color CRTs. At small sizes, this may be important as color CRTs can't get much resolution at small sizes.

LCDs may also be good... I don't too much about using them to check focus.

RCA/composite connections should be avoided here... use S-video, composite, or firewire instead.

2- With field monitors, weight may be an issue as you'd have the lug the monitor around. Figure out what kind of weight you would accept from a monitor.

---
I don't know what else you'd be using your monitor for... but those are the uses I can come up with. I assumed field use, but reading your post again that may not be the case. If you post what your needs are, then you will be able to get a better recomendation for your monitor.

field and/or studio use
how important color accuracy is
how important weight is
how important price is (you already posted this)
viewing angle important?
desired size
will you be checking focus on it?

John Cloy February 16th, 2005 01:41 PM

<<<-- Originally posted by Ian Thomas : John

How do you like your pdx10 and what do you shoot with it. -->>>

Hi Ian,

I love my PDX-10. I use it mostly for youth theater. This is a funny niche market that I have fallen into and the PDX-10 does a good job (with the exception of the often-discussed low light issues).

I use the two XLR jacks to capture feeds straight from the sound board - one for FOH sound, one for actors mics only. I also use a Sony 950 (very, very similar to the PDX-10) with a Beachtek (two more XLR jacks) to capture ambient audience reaction and orchestra pit music. With two cameras and three or four sound tracks I can mix-down a very nice sound track (often a problem at these kind of productions).

jc

John Cloy February 16th, 2005 01:47 PM

<<<-- Originally posted by Glenn Chan : One angle you can take is to look at what you're going to use your monitor for.


field and/or studio use
how important color accuracy is
how important weight is
how important price is (you already posted this)
viewing angle important?
desired size
will you be checking focus on it? -->>>

Hi Glenn,

Wow - thanks for the core dump! My interest right now is for post-production to try to get better fidelity between what I am seeing while I am editing compared to what my customers will see on the TV screen when they watch it. I am finding that I am guessing on colors, brightness and contrast between my computer monitor (a 21" LCD) and a TV screen. I'd like to edit (Vegas 5) and be previewing directly to a monitor.

Specifics:

Color accuracy: Important
Weight: Not an issue (it will stay on my desk)
Price: I'd like to stay under a thousand right now
Viewing angle: I 'll make it work
Size: I'm guessing that 14" will be fine (does anybody do day-to-day editing on an 8" or 9" - is this a problem?)
Focus checking: Nope - totally post production

Thanks!
jc

Ian Thomas February 16th, 2005 02:13 PM

Hi John.

Thanks for your reply,

I already own a pd170 and have just ordered the pdx10 after much thought.

I had the 950 some 2 yrs ago struggled with it, after useing the vx2000 for sometime, i didn't like the fact that you could not see the f values in the finder as you could in the vx.

I have just dug out some footage that i shot with it and it looks very good, and after reading the fourms which say that it does a fine job of exposure on its own i think i should have given myself more time with it,

Anyway i hope this time round with the pdx i get it right.

John Cloy February 16th, 2005 07:10 PM

<<<-- Originally posted by Ian Thomas : Hi John.

Thanks for your reply,

I already own a pd170 and have just ordered the pdx10 after much thought.

Good luck with the PDX-10 - it's a shame we don't live in the same town; I'm thinking about buying a pd170 because I have heard it does better in low light. Too bad we couldn't arrange a camera co-op!

The PDX 10 and 950 do fine when I'm in tight on my subjects, but many of my shots are on a wide stage with very contrasting light levels. Last weekend I shot a production where there were 20 kids and a set stage left that were well-lit, and stage right was a blacked out stage with five dancers wearing stark white under spotlights. Predictably the dancers were over-exposed... sigh.

jc

John Cloy February 16th, 2005 07:40 PM

Glenn,

Thanks so much for your help, just the link to Sony & Ikegami are worth their weight in gold - everything in one place to do a comparison. I'm thinking that the Sony PVM14-L2 is where I probably want to go - eventually when I'm a little more flush with cash I'll buy the 1394 interface card but until then I can use S-video.

Thanks again!
jc

Glenn Chan February 16th, 2005 08:24 PM

I don't think the 1394 interface card would make a big difference, as it would just shift the Digital-->analog convertor from your deck/camera/convertor box to the add-in card.

Ian Thomas February 17th, 2005 02:12 PM

Hi John,

The pd170 is a great camera and fantastic in low light and will see when other camera's won't, the picture is fantastic and you won't be dissapointed go for it.


Iam still waiting for my pd10x and i hope it's worth it.


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