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Old July 14th, 2009, 08:40 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Karl Lohninger View Post
8gb or 16gb don't make a difference. when in your life would you need to record 16 gb in one piece. Didn't happen to me yet. Your selections are generally solid though I would try to get second hand whatever possible and definitely step up to a lectro system, a 200 or a 400 series.
I'm sure you'd be able to save money replacing the MKH60 with a 416 (save even more with a 415T) - these are workhorses that work!

You say: Some sit down interviews, doc's, and film/tv.

Now that covers a lot and me thinks you're overstretching a bit especially with film/tv...for that you need substantially more equipment. Why not concentrate first on 'interviews' and 'doc's'.

For this you do not need (or even want) the full rycote basket. Save here and go for one of those furry's. The MKH50 is a great microphone - no question. But it's a bit on the expensive side when you're starting out. I'd say 2 wireless systems is minimum nowadays, that means 2 Lectros. Please forget the Sennheiser evolutions thingies if you want to work professionally. Again, especially when starting to build a package go 'second hand' - that's a no-brainer.
Replace the mkh50 with a (used) AKG 460/480 with a ck63 capsule. You'd get easily two of those for a mkh50. Buy your mkh50 after you'r having your basics covered. You're not there yet ;-)
More often than not production wants you to send audio wirelessly......that does mean in the very near future you're going to need 4 systems.....sad but true. Not thinking now about film work (that really is a different thing altogether) think of your recorder strictly as back-up recorder. Think of a) something small that you can schlepp around and b)just something so you can say 'yes' to a producer asking for one. That covers you. Again, good wireless systems are more important for you.

Thinking film you're going to need more than 2 tracks - if it makes sense or not, producers are going to ask for 4 or more. Plus you need to be able to deal with all timecode issues. Your Tascam HD-P2 is a fine machine alright but with some shortcomings. You'd need an additional TC generator for once + 2track limitation. For film work you'd need a smart slate plus something called experience which isn't there yet. Get that first, then move on/up. Then you get a Sound Devices machine and more microphones and more wireless systems and a bigger mixer and Comteks (lots) and video monitors (HD) and playback equipment and sound carts, a wireless boom w/ a wireless private line to your boom operator and boxes and boxes and a bigger car and a second garage to store all your stuff + you gotta find ways to get into the union too.

Karl - thank you for sharing your wisdom and experience. A lot to ponder indeed, definitely the reason I wanted to post on the board. My original thinking with the mics was to purchase quality but your are right on with your point with the wireless. They are a must have and buying more expensive mics without having the budget to get quality wireless doesn't do me much good.

Mark mentioned the Lectro 100 series, you recommended the 200 or 400 series. Any specific reasoning on that? Admittedly, I've got to do my homework on the Lectros and wireless in general.

The kind of film/tv projects are definitely smaller than that may sound, although I wouldn't be opposed to the larger projects, that's a long way off. Trying to do my best to put together a solid package of gear (that I wouldn't feel the urge to upgrade too quickly) and learn as much as possible. Most of what I put together on the list is gear that I would have liked to have had on previous work. No need for a second garage (at least not for sound equip) but would be fun to think about filling it up.

Back to tinkering with the list... Thanks again!
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Old July 14th, 2009, 12:38 PM   #17
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Karl - thank you for sharing your wisdom and experience. A lot to ponder indeed, definitely the reason I wanted to post on the board. My original thinking with the mics was to purchase quality but your are right on with your point with the wireless. They are a must have and buying more expensive mics without having the budget to get quality wireless doesn't do me much good.

Mark mentioned the Lectro 100 series, you recommended the 200 or 400 series. Any specific reasoning on that? Admittedly, I've got to do my homework on the Lectros and wireless in general.

The kind of film/tv projects are definitely smaller than that may sound, although I wouldn't be opposed to the larger projects, that's a long way off. Trying to do my best to put together a solid package of gear (that I wouldn't feel the urge to upgrade too quickly) and learn as much as possible. Most of what I put together on the list is gear that I would have liked to have had on previous work. No need for a second garage (at least not for sound equip) but would be fun to think about filling it up.

Back to tinkering with the list... Thanks again!

Ok - did some digging on the Lectrosonics 100 and 200 series, seeing that 200 offers diversity. Everything I've read points to Lectrosonics as very reliable and solid, although saw that the 100 is more comparable to the Senn systems (at a much higher price).

Question I have...has there been any feedback on the upcoming Sennheiser G3 wireless system? I've read good and bad regarding the G2, some saying that's probably the first rung of the pro ladder, others relying on it. Maybe the G3 will be another step up and worth for the release date in September before going for a more expensive product?

I'm leaning toward the Tram50 or Countryman B6 lavs either way. Starting to lean a bit more toward the B6 for the ability to hide them. Would there be additional costs involved to allow for compatibility to the Senn G2/G3 systems?
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Old July 14th, 2009, 02:37 PM   #18
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Before upgrading to the Lectrosonics I used Sennheiser G2 units. The mics supplied with them were just ok, and I ended up buying better mics for the Sennheisers. Also the Lectrosonic 100 series is 50mw vs the Sennheisers 35mw power.


I also have a Countryman B6 in my kit, excellent sound and water proof. It works well for hiding but I find it gets lost under clothing. The Trams come with a complete mounting setup kit and I prefer it for mounting to the talents shirt or coat.

The higher end Lectrosonics are deep pocket cash units, you will see them on any big budget movie set.
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Old July 14th, 2009, 02:57 PM   #19
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The B6 is good to have but almost a specialty mic. Start with Trams, they're quick and easy to mount. They're not really great, but they became a standard somehow and do their job.

Generally: you want to work professionally you use professional tools, voila.
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Old July 14th, 2009, 03:14 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Mark Boyer View Post
Before upgrading to the Lectrosonics I used Sennheiser G2 units. The mics supplied with them were just ok, and I ended up buying better mics for the Sennheisers. Also the Lectrosonic 100 series is 50mw vs the Sennheisers 35mw power.


I also have a Countryman B6 in my kit, excellent sound and water proof. It works well for hiding but I find it gets lost under clothing. The Trams come with a complete mounting setup kit and I prefer it for mounting to the talents shirt or coat.

The higher end Lectrosonics are deep pocket cash units, you will see them on any big budget movie set.
I'd definitely like to go with the Lectrosonics at some point and will try and do some testing locally if possible. Have you heard anything on the G3's compared to the G2? Doesn't look like any has their hands on it yet (saw that Sweetwater is saying they'll have them by 8/2).

Regarding the specific lav, do you have a personal recommendation for a lav mic that sounds well when hidden? Sanken COS-11x's? I'd like to have a pair that could go either way (never the perfect solution I know) and still maintain quality sound.
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Old July 14th, 2009, 03:15 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Karl Lohninger View Post
The B6 is good to have but almost a specialty mic. Start with Trams, they're quick and easy to mount. They're not really great, but they became a standard somehow and do their job.

Generally: you want to work professionally you use professional tools, voila.
Thanks Karl. What do you think the next step up sound quality wise would be from the Trams? Any particular feedback on hiding them?
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Old July 14th, 2009, 03:23 PM   #22
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The AT 899 is a nice sounding mic, comes with a variety of mounts and a few bucks less than a Tram, though not as popular. IMO, it seems to hold up better than Trams'... cable gets pulled out of head and beyond repair.
I have not seen the new smaller AT-__ Lav, designed to compete with B6 I guess.
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Old July 14th, 2009, 03:28 PM   #23
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The AT 899 is a nice sounding mic, comes with a variety of mounts and a few bucks less than a Tram, though not as popular. IMO, it seems to hold up better than Trams'... cable gets pulled out of head and beyond repair.
I have not seen the new smaller AT-__ Lav, designed to compete with B6 I guess.
Thanks Rick! I hadn't considered the AT's.

I think I'm heading back to Dan Brockett's fine lav article this evening to do some more reading and listening. Seems like a daily mental back and forth with me.
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Old July 14th, 2009, 04:42 PM   #24
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All lavs have deficiencies as far as I know. The TRAM is a standard because as I said it's quick and easy to mount - that's actually important - and it's a know quantity (quality) used pretty much everywhere. So you'll fit in. I have a few B6 and they really come in handy when there's no place to hide (Malibu beach movies i.e. not kidding) but they're a bit fragile and they don't like wind at all. As I said, specialty items if nothing else works. Sankens are fine and DPA's are fine - there's the AKG ck77 I think is awsome and so on. But really you shouldn't worry, go with the trams - other stuff comes later.

Last edited by Karl Lohninger; July 15th, 2009 at 12:45 PM.
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Old July 15th, 2009, 09:02 AM   #25
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All lavs have deficiencies as far as I know. The TRAM is a standard because as I said it's quick and easy to mount - that's actually important - and it's a know quantity (quality) used pretty much everywhere. So you'll fit in. I have a few B6 and they really come in handy when there's no place to hide (Malibu beach movies i.e. not kidding) but they're a bit fragile and they don't like wind at all. As I said, specialty items if nothing else works. Sankens are fine and DPA's are fine - there's the AKG ck77 I think is awsome and so on. But really you shouldn't worry, got with the trams - other stuff comes later.
Thanks Karl, points taken. Much appreciated!
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