Zoom H4N Line Input - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

All Things Audio
Everything Audio, from acquisition to postproduction.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 15th, 2010, 11:20 PM   #16
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,550
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seth Bloombaum View Post
One thing you should know - live sound operators vary greatly in the gain structure they use. More often than not, this will mean that they do not use the board's meters at all.

What this means to you is... although the mixer is nominally a +4 device, you may be seeing -20db peaks, or less.

Unless the operator came from a recording background...

Just be aware this varies widely, and include some time in your plan for you to adapt as needed to the op's practices. Use your headphones on the H4n during setup, best to be there for sound check to set your levels.
Yeah it didn't work,it was too hot and distorted and unusable, just like I thought. I have a pad/attenuator but like I explained its an inline xlr which the h4n will only do mic not line.
Pete Cofrancesco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2010, 06:16 AM   #17
Trustee
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Little Rock
Posts: 1,383
The correct formula would be...
Mixer +4 line out / 15 dB pad / XLR to 1/4" TRS / -10 line in to H4N.

All the Best!
__________________
David W. Jones
www.joneshdfilms.com

Last edited by David W. Jones; May 16th, 2010 at 07:10 AM.
David W. Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2010, 07:51 AM   #18
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,550
I'm thinking about getting an ART AVDirect
Anyone use one of these or a similar converter? I like the flexibility as long as it can convert a hot line signal to a mic level.

I'm also looking at Whirlwind IMP2 it has a 1/4 out.
Pete Cofrancesco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 19th, 2010, 01:46 PM   #19
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Karlsruhe, Germany
Posts: 80
I had a H4n for a couple of weeks and also did some testing of the input levels.
See here for details: Field recorder harmonics
Hope this helps.
Martin
__________________
Best regards, Martin
<<< Visit my homepage: http://www.Martin-Doppelbauer.de >>>
Martin Doppelbauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 19th, 2010, 11:37 PM   #20
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,550
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Doppelbauer View Post
I had a H4n for a couple of weeks and also did some testing of the input levels.
See here for details: Field recorder harmonics
Hope this helps.
Martin
Thanks, you confirmed what I suspected mainly the H4N can only handle consumer line level not professional. The cheapest way to address the problem is buying a converter that will reduce it down to mic level. But its rather annoying that a $300 recorder has 1/4" input that can't handle pro line level and that they don't document it, leaving the user to discover it on their own.
Pete Cofrancesco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 20th, 2010, 06:22 AM   #21
Trustee
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Little Rock
Posts: 1,383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Cofrancesco View Post
Thanks, you confirmed what I suspected mainly the H4N can only handle consumer line level not professional. The cheapest way to address the problem is buying a converter that will reduce it down to mic level. But its rather annoying that a $300 recorder has 1/4" input that can't handle pro line level and that they don't document it, leaving the user to discover it on their own.
Pete, in all fairness the specs on the H4N have been well documented.
They have been discussed on-line, and a simple google search will pull up many threads on the subject,
as well as on page 147 of your user manual.

By going into the H4N via Mic level, you are adding the H4N Mic Pre's back into the equation.
The solution which will give you the cleanest signal path would be to remain at line level from your source to your H4N, and use a simple pad to match the impedance levels.
The cheapest way to do this... soldering iron/resisters.

A more elegant solution is to buy a couple of In-Line Pads with Selectable Attenuation.
I use a pair with 15, 20, 25 db selectable pad.
Now just add a couple of XLR to TRS adapters, and you have a professional quality level matching solution that you can use in many situations for years to come.

All the Best!
__________________
David W. Jones
www.joneshdfilms.com
David W. Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2010, 04:52 PM   #22
Trustee
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,550
thx david.

You're right its in the back of the manual but they don't go out of their way to explain it in layman's terms. I get the feeling they intended the 1/4 inputs for musical instruments such as a guitar or keyboard and not for plugging into electronic devices and sound boards. They also don't make it clear the xlr inputs are only for mic level.

Your other point, I already ordered the converter box but I just put in an order for xlr to 1/4 cables so I'll be able to connect my inline pad/attenuator like you suggested.
Pete Cofrancesco is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > All Things Audio

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:12 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network