Who do you think the greatest director of all time is and why? - Page 6 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Awake In The Dark

Awake In The Dark
What you're watching these days on the Big Screen and the Small Screen.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 9th, 2007, 11:34 PM   #76
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Hollywood USA
Posts: 128
My favorite is always Akira Kurosawa, Cecile B Demille.
__________________
Canon XHA1, SGpro,Flip,FF, RR Mattebox, Nebtek V-R70p-HDA with Canon, Nikkor Primes 24mm f2.8, 28mm f2.8, 35mm f2.0, 50mm f1.4, 85mm f1.4, 105mm f1.8, 135mm f2.0, and 300mm f4.0.
Cary Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 10th, 2007, 07:18 AM   #77
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 917
Gotta be someone like Michael Hanike or The Dardenne brothers. The Son (le Fils) is probably the best movie I have ever seen.

Obviously names like Godard and Felini are right up there, as are, funnily enough, names like Kubric and Spielberg, but my Money is on Hanike or the Dardennes (they might lose cause there are two of them).

Kurosawa is also right up there.
Matthew Nayman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 10th, 2007, 07:20 PM   #78
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lanark,Scotland
Posts: 736
Im amazed theres six pages on this subject...i sure aint read them all, what do you actually mean by best director? do you mean the best films? in that case its like asking whos the best musician ever.... i like the who but a lot of people like justin timberlake who i hate and i don't like jaz much. Or do you mean who is the most successfull? hmmm in that case there are only a handfull and they are all as big as each other....you know who they are. or is it the best director to work with? only the people under them can know that.....the runners and the dop's and the lighting guys , iv heard michael bay is a real bas##rd to work for but what do i know i just like his films.

its a redundant question, why not ask whats your favourate films.

The director is a guy/girl that works with a LOT of other people to make a film look good its not all his/her triumph, not enough recognition goes to the other people that get things done like joe bloggs that threaded a hundred thousand plastic rings etc to make the chainmail vests on lord of the rings.
__________________
Actor: "where would that light be coming from?"
DP: "same place as the music" -Andrew Lesnie-
Andy Graham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2007, 05:58 PM   #79
Major Player
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Toronto Ontario Canada
Posts: 239
Sure, why talk about the director at all. Afterall, if it wasn't for craft services, there wouldn't be a movie. Not to mention the Teamsters. And the guy who runs the machine that puts the plastic on the DVD case. With all them folks, who needs a director

Right?
Victor Kellar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2007, 08:44 PM   #80
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lanark,Scotland
Posts: 736
funny you should mention craft services, in indie filmaking at least they are the most important factor in keeping cast and crew happy and im sure its important on big movies. The director has a hard stressfull job as does the producer and exec producer, every person in every department relys on each others skills, a great job by the camera department or sound department can be for nothing if any of the other departments aren't up to scratch. On a Hollywood movie its a guarentee that all departments are as good as they can be but with any indie film its up to who the best person you can get. The bottom line is a good director needs a good crew behind him wether it be a small crew or a huge crew. The fact still remains the director is a part of a bigger picture....he may be in charge but the requirments for skilled people is no less and the director can't make the film on his own.

Do you think steven speilberg would put the plastic on his DVDs? he'd probably screw a lot of them up before he got it right.

Andy.
__________________
Actor: "where would that light be coming from?"
DP: "same place as the music" -Andrew Lesnie-
Andy Graham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 15th, 2007, 02:27 AM   #81
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Belgium
Posts: 2,195
People are just naming their favorite directors, and why they are their favorites... Don't see anything wrong with that.
If you know call it the 'best director' thread or the 'favorite director' thread, anyone will know what you are talking about, a little bit stupid to whine about that... Everyone has his *best* director: it's their favorite, the one they *mostly* enjoy their movies a lot.
The director is still most of the time the one who's *vision* ends up on the screen.

Let people have this discussion, it's enjoying.

Matthew, curiously to see someone from another far country mention The d'Ardenne brothers (from my country). I personally don't like their movies that much, they are good in what they do, but I like more stilistic movies.
Still, nice to see they are so well known.
Mathieu Ghekiere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 15th, 2007, 04:17 AM   #82
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lanark,Scotland
Posts: 736
I don't mean to sound like im whineing, I guess its because when my company makes films im the only one who knows how to work a camera, edit , light and put all the equipment together which basicly makes my job a lot harder than anyone elses but the director gets the credit.

But you're right it is usually the directors vision that ends up on screen, i do sometimes wonder how certain films would look if someone else had directed them.

I'll say no more

Andy.
__________________
Actor: "where would that light be coming from?"
DP: "same place as the music" -Andrew Lesnie-
Andy Graham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 15th, 2007, 05:00 AM   #83
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Belgium
Posts: 2,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Graham View Post
i do sometimes wonder how certain films would look if someone else had directed them.
That's a whole other question, and it would provide for an interesting discussion as well.
Mathieu Ghekiere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 17th, 2007, 10:51 AM   #84
Trustee
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 1,564
i dunno who said this, but theatre is an actor's medium, tv is the writer's and film the director's. does this still hold true today?

i'm so sure. i think there's a lot of mixing and blending these days. lots of film film directors like barry sonnefield are coming to TV (he directed pilot for pushign daisies and it looks like a film) and TV directors going to film and both going to theatre and back forth. same with actors+writers.

in all these artistics mediums it's the team that does deserve a collective award, but then isn't what the best picture, play, tv, etc. the final award of the night should be for the collective team responsible for the art.

having said of all that, i think it is still pretty true. if you've been watching mad men on amc lately, the writing comes through loud and clear even if the other dept. are doing a very fine job. same with theatre, great actors get repeat viewing from theatre nuts no matter the title. films still LOOK a certain way even if the director changes DP, like david fincher. you are still watching a david fincher film.
__________________
bow wow wow
Yi Fong Yu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 18th, 2007, 11:02 PM   #85
Trustee
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Vancouver BC Canada
Posts: 1,315
I kinda agree with Andy here.
Every movie is a combination of efforts. Stanley and Ridley instantly jump to my mind. If we are going to specify director here, it would have to go to Stanley, as when I think about the two big Ridley works (Alien/Bladerunner) it is clearly the cinematography that comes to mind. Yes there is powerful direction, but it clearly has its ups and downs compared to the cinematography which in both films is near perfect. Does this equal direction?
I do not believe anyone has mentioned Terry Gilliam yet. He deserves a strong mention. Brazil and The Adventures of Baron Münchhausen, are both brilliant works of art. I personally believe that any director that can pull you out of the "norm" and place you in an alternate time/place so convincingly is truly a great director. Gilliam clearly does this with great style and flare, and often reflective humor.
Anyways please add Gilliam to the pile ;>)
__________________
Damnit Jim, I'm a film maker not a sysytems tech.
Ken Hodson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 21st, 2007, 04:51 AM   #86
Major Player
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Conwy, Wales
Posts: 208
For me the greatest would have to be Kubrick. Lori is right with the notion that 2001 : A Space Odyssey is the film of the 20th century. It was simply mind blowing and still is!

Other directors I rate for one reason or another are :

Michael Mann : Fantastic action sequences and excellent choice of music.

William Friedkin : The guy was warped but brilliant at scaring people.

Frank Darabont : Beautiful work.

James Cameron : The Abyss kinda does it for me.
Dave Robinson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 22nd, 2007, 08:07 AM   #87
Trustee
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Little Rock
Posts: 1,383
Has to be Harold Heckuba.
I mean who could top Hamlet-A-Go-Go!
David W. Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2007, 03:50 PM   #88
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 29
This is so wierd, but none of my favorite directors have gotten much (if any) mention here.

My "A" List is:

Joel Coen - Barton Fink is one of the best films ever made.
Quentin Tarantino - modern genius. Pulp Fiction was amazing.
Terry Gillliam - for almost everything he's ever done. Just don't watch "Tideland" and you'll be fine. :)
David Lynch - I usually don't understand his movies. Maybe that's why I like them.

My "B" list is:

Spielberg - just for profligate production of good films.
P.T. Anderson - never disappoints.
Ridley Scott, with a few exceptions.
Robert Hruska is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2007, 03:51 PM   #89
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Hruska View Post
Terry Gillliam - for almost everything he's ever done. Just don't watch "Tideland" and you'll be fine. :)
Funny, I just saw "Tideland," and really liked it!

Also, although I wouldn't put him in the same category as Kubrick, Kurosawa, or Kiezlowski ("the Killer K's!"), Jim Jarmusch has always been one of my personal favorites. Ditto John Sayles.

FWIW, the Guardian(UK) recently published an article on (in the editors' opinion) the top 40 living film directors. You can find it here:
http://film.guardian.co.uk/features/...082823,00.html

There's some overlap with this list, but also some folks who do not show up in this thread.
__________________
http://www.prolefeedstudios.com/blog/
Documentary for the masses!
Brian Standing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2007, 04:02 PM   #90
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Standing View Post
Funny, I just saw "Tideland," and really liked it!

Also, although I wouldn't put him in the same category of a Kubrick, Kurosawa, or Kiezlowski ("the Killer K's!"), Jim Jarmusch has always been one of my personal favorites.

FWIW, the Guardian(UK) recently published an article on (in the editors' opinion) the top 40 living film directors. You can find it here:
http://film.guardian.co.uk/features/...082823,00.html
I didn't hate Tideland as much as most people did, but as a story, it seemed to fall apart for me at the end. A lot of people were put off by the dead dad, and also (understandably) the references to childhood sexuality. Neither of those bothered me as much as just not understanding what the point of it all was.

Which is to say, I don't think Tideland was a terrible movie, and it was definitely a courageous one, but most people wouldn't like it, and I don't really blame them, because it is way, way out there.
Robert Hruska is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Awake In The Dark

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:53 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network