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Old June 23rd, 2003, 11:09 AM   #106
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There are two ways to get motion HDR: time-elapse (this works well for getting light probes of skies--with the sun arcing across, and the clouds flitting by), or with a real-time HDR lightprobe, as ICT presented in a sketch in SIGGRAPH 2001. The device consists of a video camera--in the sketch it was a VX1000--nailed to a 2 x 4, pointed at a small chrome ball (light probe) planted at the other end of the 2 x 4 (so that the camera never moves in relation to the light probe). A five-facet beam splitter (with each facet coated with a ND filter, each ND filter the same number of stops apart) is attached to the camera lens. The five images are recombined and chromashift corrected using specially-written software into a high dynamic range image.

Of course, this video HDR image is necessarily one fifth the resolution of the full resolution of the video camera being used.

It's the third sketch in this series.

When I was at ICT there was talk of a patent being put in for this application. I'm not sure what the status of its filing is now.
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Old June 24th, 2003, 10:31 AM   #107
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VOD is coming!

http://www.instat.com/press.asp?ID=562&sku=IN030587MB

This might seem a little off-topic from the first sight, but Video-On-Demand is coming really soon. It might become a major distribution channel for indie movies. Actually, at zero cost it puts indie productions at the same level of access convenience as Hollywood biggies.
What is your opinion?
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Old June 24th, 2003, 11:03 AM   #108
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We already have video on demand, it's called TiVo. Centralizing the video sources might only serve to consolidate power for the content owners while disenfranchising consumers.
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Old June 24th, 2003, 11:22 AM   #109
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My understanding is that TiVo is just a convenient recorder of TV programs, although I'm not sure as there is no TiVo over here, in Israel.
On the other hand VOD basically grants everybody access to a giant movie repository. All that indie production should do is to ask a cable operator put its movie to that repository. This makes it accessible to all viewers. This benefits both sides: cable operator having big repository wins more customers, while indie production becomes easily accessible. And this does not cost much to both sides. It's kind of win-win situation.
Well, I'm just speculating, but it looks to me it might be a major breakthrough for indie producers.
And there is no immediate threat to big filmmakers, as at the beginning indie would be just a small fraction of them. Then in future the balance might change ... or not change.
I'm speculating here, but it looks like a very possible scenario to me.
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Old June 24th, 2003, 12:21 PM   #110
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Vladimir, you could be right, that VOD may allow better access to lesser known works. My problem with the model is that I suspect content distributors will only make available in their libraries the high-traffic content. Media conglomerates don't use cinemaplexes to give voices to little-known filmmakers, what evidence is there that should give us hope broadband pipes will be any different? Not only will we be peddled the same old innumerable Charlie's Angels sequels, but streaming VOD will surely introduce stringent DRM, built-in commercials that won't be skippable, and various other measures aimed at maximizing content owner profits and minimizing consumer choice and consumer rights.
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Old June 24th, 2003, 03:49 PM   #111
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Today there are several schemes for HDR imagers, especially in the CMOS field. Sarnof (USA), Fraunhofer (Germany), Fillfactory (Belgium) and many othe, all have "solutions" for HDR
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Old June 24th, 2003, 04:24 PM   #112
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Amazing. It will be funny if they start to use this in filmmaking because film has certian range and this will make everything look so life-like that it can change the way you make films. Some people might just keep on using film because of the look. Soon you will be able to get robotic eyes with this chip and it will come with magnifine glass within it so you can see miles down the road.

Rob:D
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Old June 25th, 2003, 03:47 AM   #113
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<<<-- Originally posted by Robert Knecht Schmidt : Media conglomerates don't use cinemaplexes to give voices to little-known filmmakers, what evidence is there that should give us hope broadband pipes will be any different? -->>>

Robert, I *think* the difference is the cost. In VOD business all that the cable company should do is to put content on their hard disk and make it accessible from a long list of titles. It does not occupy broadcasting time, like in TiVo or regular boradcasting. Only if somebody buys it's transmitted just to his own TV. For cable company each movie is one-time investment and it's not that big, say $50 for 5GB full-length movie space. It can be that indie producer pays this. In worst case the movie will get lost in the endless list of indie films and nobody ever order it. In best case word of mouth or review in some magazine attract customers.
For the theater, one has to pay a lot of advertisement fo bring the public. It's much more money. For DVD renting companies, one has to print DVDs. Then these DVDs occupy precious shelf space in the shop. If it's rented rarely, it does not makes sense for shop to keep these DVDs.
All in all, VOD looks to me as a much easier path to public. That is least expensive path.
I understand there are obstacles, like most cable companies belong to big Hollywood studios. I don't know how independent the cable divisions. In cany case, the threat to Hollywood is minor at the beginning.
All this is just my own speculation, but it looks very logical to me.
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Old June 25th, 2003, 10:55 AM   #114
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It will be good once the only problem is marketing. :)
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Old June 29th, 2003, 09:39 PM   #115
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DV Camps July Workshop

A heads up regarding a two-day hands-on filmmaking workshop slated for July 12-13 2003 at Samy’s Camera, 41 East Walnut St Pasadena, CA 91103.

The first day is devoted to a complete overview of the DV production process. Attendees get hands-on camerawork using Canon XL-1S, GL2, plus lighting and sound recording techniques. Learn From The Pros currently working in the industry like Director of Photography Marco Fargnoli, lighting specialist John Gresch, Arriflex Corporation, sound recordist Tom Staninis and writer-director Robert Grasmere.

Sunday is all about post-production. Certified Apple FCP trainer Andrew Balis teaches the all-new Final Cut Pro 4. Attendees lean all the latest edit tips and tricks plus how to prepare content for multi-media release using the innovative Sorenson Squeeze compression software.

The Camp has a casual atmosphere and opportunities abound to speak one-on-one with the highly regarded teaching staff.

Anyone interested can get more info by calling 1 (800) 525-5854 or Visit www.DVCamps.com

Thanks,
Geoff Zimmerman
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