Dolly Question at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Dolly / Track / Cable


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old March 9th, 2005, 03:54 PM   #1
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 55
Dolly Question

I've made a 2' x 2' dolly using metal corner braces and 2 skateboard wheels for the wheel trucks, but I'm now looking to build a larger dolly that will comfortably accomodate an operator and camera and I would like to use 8 wheels per truck (4 on each side). To do this would require the use of angle iron, but I've seen this stuff and can't imagine trying to cut it down to the length of a truck with a hand saw, or any other tool in my garage. I can't imagine drilling through it either.

Has anyone done this before? I'm just looking for people's past experiences, not speculations on how it might be done. Thanks in advance.

Rick Pearson,
Producer/Director
Next Level Media Productions
http://www.nextlevelmediaproductions.com
__________________
Rick Pearson,
http://www.nextlevelmediaproductions.com
Rick Pearson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2005, 05:16 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Juneau, Alaska, USA
Posts: 624
I used aluminum for mine, and cut it with a (short!) hand hacksaw.
took a while, and once i was close i just bent it and broke off hte last bit. but it worked.

- I also used some flat thick Iorn - that took bloody ages to cut with a handsaw. - but actually drilled through with a (mains powered (cabled)) hand drill really easily with a steel bit.

Good luck, and happy cutting!

- Mikko
Mikko Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2005, 05:59 PM   #3
New Boot
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Carmel Valley, California
Posts: 14
Rick,

I'm not sure what your design is, but I used 2' x 4' plywood for a platform, with mild steel angle from the hardware store to carry the wheels. The steel is about 1/8" thick, and isn't all that hard to work--I cut it to length with a hacksaw, and while I used a drill press to drill mounting holes in the steel, I think I could have done it with an electric drill if necessary.

I based my design on John Hudson's--he posted links here to some videos he made of and with his dolly, and they're quite useful.

Good luck.

--Arthur
Arthur Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2005, 07:27 PM   #4
Trustee
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 1,727
I just got a metal angle brace from the hardware store and it's worked a treat. My dolly is about 1.3m x 1.3m and can hold camera and person. As long as I had a bolt the right length, it holds everything in place fine.


Aaron
__________________
My Website
Meat Free Media
Aaron Koolen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 10th, 2005, 09:23 AM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 81
We used angle iron, and were able to cut through it with an angle grinder. Drilling holes took a while, but with decent drill bits, lots of oil, and some patience, it was fine.

A tip: use one of those small/portable bed frames for your angle iron. They're cheap, and one of the sides might already be the length you're looking for.

Ryan
Ryan Graham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 10th, 2005, 10:35 AM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 220
>>I've made a 2' x 2' dolly using metal corner braces and 2 skateboard wheels for the wheel trucks, but I'm now looking to build a larger dolly that will comfortably accomodate an operator and camera and I would like to use 8 wheels per truck (4 on each side). To do this would require the use of angle iron, but I've seen this stuff and can't imagine trying to cut it down to the length of a truck with a hand saw, or any other tool in my garage. I can't imagine drilling through it either.

Hi Rick,

You can use the same corner braces that you used on the 2x2 dolly on a larger platform. You just need to strengthen the underside of the dolly: get 2 lengths of 'L' shaped aluminum or steel the same length as the platform going the long way. Get a bunch of wood screws that are a bit longer than 3/4". Drill holes in one side of the 'L' of the angle iron or aluminum about every 4" along the length of the 'L' big enough to allow the screws to go through them. Attach the angle steel along the bottom of the dolly platform about 4-6 inches in from the long edge of the platform. Take the second angle and do the same on the other side. This will make it plenty strong enough to stand on.

As for cutting and drilling steel: get a new hacksaw blade and start cutting. It's not difficult. When you drill into any metal, get a thing called a Prick Punch. It's like a chisel, but comes to a point at the end. Find where you want to drill the hole, set the point of the punch and give it a good whack or two with a hammer. This will make a dimple to set the drill bit point in to. This will keep your bit from walking. Use some stuff called "drilling oil" and pour a bit into the dimple and start drilling. As soon as the oil dries up, put more in. You basically want to keep the drill bit wet. In aluminum, this will go quickly. In steel, you'll probably have to add the oil a few times before you make it through the steel.

Good luck!

Dan
www.DVcameraRigs.com
Dan Selakovich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2005, 01:11 AM   #7
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 94
cutting and drilling info

Ok all you home shop guys. Notes from a machinist on cutting and drilling steel.

First all tools are available at Home Depot or the local hardware store.

Cutting- Hacksaw with a Fine tooth blade (18, 22, 30) teeth per inch. The harder the material the more teeth per inch you want. Make sure the teeth are facing forward. Hacksaws cut on the push stroke, not the pull stroke. Make sure the blade is under tension in the handle. You can adjust this and the blade shouldn't be too loose. Use a sulpher based cutting oil. You can use "tapping oil" for steel if that is all you can find. Put the angle iron in a vise and clamp it down. Then clamp the vise to the bench top. Put most of your pressure on the push stroke. release pressure when you pull back, the saw isn't cutting then.

Drilling - Best option is a drill press.CLAMP THE PART!!!!!! Keep the speed around 80 rpm or less.
In steel, slower is better. If you have to use a hand drill, do this. CLAMP THE PART!!!! Scribe or draw an "X" where you want the hole. If you have a center punch, tap the intersection of the lines with it and make a detent in the steel. If the final hole you want to drill is say...3/8" in diameter, start with a 1/8" drill bit and drill a hole. Then use a 1/4" bit to enlarge the hole. Finish with a 3/8" drill bit. Remember!!!! slower is better in harder materials as well as when the bits get larger in diameter. Don't push too hard on the drill. Let the bit do the cutting. A good style of bit is a standard "Jobber" bit. It is a 118 degree bit. materials are HSS (High speed Steel), Cobalt, TIN Coated (Titanium Nitride - the gold colored bits) or Solid Carbide bits. I recommend either the Cobalt or the TIN Bits. TIN lasts longer.

Any Questions.... Buy the Machinists Handbook at your local book store or library. Ton's of great info.

BTW......... CLAMP YOUR PARTS. Otherwise they turn into little helicopters as they sail across your garage and they WILL impale your kid......who was watching over your shoulder...... to the wall.

Good Luck.
David Mesloh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 14th, 2005, 08:03 AM   #8
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 220
Heed David's words! Especially the Helicopter part!

Oh, one more thing: if the drill bit does get stuck, don't put it back in the hole, then start the bit moving. It will just get stuck again. Start the bit moving above the hole, then lower it in slowly.

Also, if you are going to be drilling a lot of metal, a drill doctor for sharpening bits is a good investment. It'll save you a fortune in the long run!

Dan
www.DVcameraRigs.com
Dan Selakovich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2005, 03:25 PM   #9
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 55
Examples of Dolly shots

URL: http://nextlevelmediaproductions.com...southmetro.wmv

This is a spot I shot the other day using my dolly for the second half of the spot.
__________________
Rick Pearson,
http://www.nextlevelmediaproductions.com
Rick Pearson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2005, 10:36 PM   #10
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 84
I just made a dolly using 2 hand-trucks from Lowe's. It has a seat, handle, wheels that don't need a track, a monitor mount and an arm that extends from 2 ft up to 7 ft. Oh, and I made it for less than $200.

When one person sits and another pushes, you get the most beautiful, smooth shots ... and you can jib up and down while you're rolling. It's hard to use by yourself, though, because it has rubber wheels that bounce - it needs the weight of someone to roll smoothly.

Nobody believes that I built it - it looks just like something you'd see a real film crew using. I'll try to figure out how to post pictures on here.
Daniel Stone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 17th, 2005, 07:24 PM   #11
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Rogers, Arkansas
Posts: 8
Regarding your Lowe's Dolly

Yes, Daniel. I'd like to see that! Thanks for sharing!

Jim
Jim Parks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2005, 06:30 AM   #12
RED Code Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Holland
Posts: 12,514
Daniel: you can't attach pictures to this forum. So you need to
host them on a website and link to them. If you can't get that
done, e-mail me a couple of pictures and I'll put them up on my
site.

Can you tell us a bit more about how you made the arm on the
dolly and so forth?
__________________

Rob Lohman, visuar@iname.com
DV Info Wrangler & RED Code Chef

Join the DV Challenge | Lady X

Search DVinfo.net for quick answers | Buy from the best: DVinfo.net sponsors
Rob Lohman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2005, 09:18 AM   #13
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 220
You guys might want to take a look at this:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=37320

dan
www.DVcameraRigs.com
Dan Selakovich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2005, 09:42 AM   #14
New Boot
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Rogers, Arkansas
Posts: 8
Re: Harbor Freight

Good morning, Dan! What a strange coincidence!!!

I just ordered your book 15 minutes ago, and I'm just about to leave for Harbor Freight to look at drill presses.

Hope you see this today. Read my comment/question on my order!

Jim
Jim Parks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 19th, 2005, 10:15 AM   #15
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 220
Hi Jim,

You know, a drill press will make things easier, but not necessary! The drill guide will come in handy though!

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=41166

Also, if you get the drill press, get a drill press vise to go with it.

Thanks for ordering a 2nd book! I get so many people ordering other copies for friends.

Dan
www.DVcameraRigs.com
Dan Selakovich is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Support Your Local Camera > Dolly / Track / Cable

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:31 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network