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GY-HD 100 & 200 series ProHD HDV camcorders & decks.


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Old April 8th, 2006, 10:14 AM   #1
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JVC proHD tapes

Recently I bought a JVC HD100 Hdv camcorder. With it I got a box of JVC ProHD mini DV tapes. On the tapes it says that they are for HDV and DV. When I shoot with the JVC and playback on the same camera everything is fine. But when I played back these tapes shot with the JVC on another mini DV camera which is not hdv, the audio is all distorted. Then I made another trial using normal dv tapes for shooting with the JVC. These tapes played good even on the other mini DV camcorder. Is this a normal thing to happen with the proHD tapes? And is it really a must to use proHD tapes for the HD100?
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Old April 8th, 2006, 11:51 AM   #2
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You should be using Panasonic AY-DVM63PQ or AY-DVM63MQ both these tape are being used for this camera. You can only playback what you recorded in this camera on HDV, or the deck, the BR-50. These tapes will not playback on any other decks or cameras, remember this is HDV, not DV, It's a diferent codec. hope this was helpful. There is more information on many subjects on this forum that will help you out, good luck
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Old April 8th, 2006, 12:14 PM   #3
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Sorry I forgot to tell you, for the time being I am filming in DV with the HD100 as my product will end on dvd for home users. I was trying to playback on another camera to save the running hours on th JVC.
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Old April 10th, 2006, 12:31 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Palmier
Sorry I forgot to tell you, for the time being I am filming in DV with the HD100 as my product will end on dvd for home users. I was trying to playback on another camera to save the running hours on th JVC.
if you are using prohd tapes and shooting in dv, they will play back fine on a panasonic. they won't playback fine on a canon, especially xl series and i don't know if they'll playback properly on a sony. but definitely on a panasonic, even a cheap 300.00 panasonic.
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Old April 19th, 2006, 11:59 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manny Rodriguez
You should be using Panasonic AY-DVM63PQ or AY-DVM63MQ both these tape are being used for this camera. You can only playback what you recorded in this camera on HDV, or the deck, the BR-50. These tapes will not playback on any other decks or cameras, remember this is HDV, not DV, It's a diferent codec. hope this was helpful. There is more information on many subjects on this forum that will help you out, good luck
Why the panasonic instead of the ProHD tapes? I need to purchase a box myself.
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Old April 19th, 2006, 12:15 PM   #6
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The panasonic tapes are better

The panasonic tapes are better tapes than the pro jvc tapes and they will play back on any deck compatable with the camera and format you shoot with, it has nothing to due with the tape it self its the camera and format. Panasonic owns JVC the tapes Panasonic makes for thier cameras are a dry tape format just like JVC and due well with the gy-hd 100 and their high end tapes are better than JVC pro tapes.
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Old April 19th, 2006, 01:07 PM   #7
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Is there a technical reason why the panasonic tapes are "better?"

Reason I ask is, we have had dropouts on Sony and Panasonic Tapes, yet the JVC Pro HD tapes have had no dropouts at all.
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Old April 19th, 2006, 05:02 PM   #8
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Page 8 of the camera manual says to use JVC tapes and gives two options:
M-DV63HD
M-DV63PROHD

And in my experience (similar to Mark) I've found that the JVC Pro HD tapes give far, far less drop-outs than the Panasonic tapes.

In answer to George's original problem, perhaps try the M-DV63HD tape recommended above. (I'm not personally familiar with that one, but as it doesn't bear a "Pro HD" designation maybe it will give a different [better] response when played back on the other camera.) If it's possible to obtain one in your area, it's definitely worth a try.

A simpler (although expensive) solution to saving the wear and tear on your camera heads would be to get the Firestore DR-HD100 which records straight to a Hard Drive and then you just load the files straight into your editing computer (and keep your tapes purely as a back-up).
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Old April 19th, 2006, 07:00 PM   #9
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Can I capture Pana tapes shot on my hd100 in dv mode using my canon optura 60 camera as a deck?
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 06:56 PM   #10
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New dv tape by FujiFilm

Hey guys what do you make of this, I must admit I have experienced some drop out with Sonys High end tape too though its been extremely limited.

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Here is a FujiFilm press release for a new HDV tape. - Corey Boutilier


Valhalla, NY, April 18, 2006 - Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc., a subsidiary of the leading global imaging and information technologies company, today announced the introduction of Fujifilm-branded HDV videotape, to be shown at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in Las Vegas next week. The new Fujifilm Professional Grade HDV videocassettes will be on display at the Fujifilm booth in South Hall #SU149.

Television broadcasters and production companies are increasingly making high-definition content available and affordable to the general public. This high-capacity digital content is increasing demand for new tools to make the capture of high quality digital video simple and affordable. Although there are several high-definition standards, the HDV format has rapidly become popular with both professionals in the broadcast and industrial markets.

"HDV offers a new way to capture and display high-quality high-definition images," said Tom Daly, Director of Marketing for Professional Markets, Fujifilm Recording Media Division. "By introducing Fujifilm-branded professional HDV media, video professionals will have greater access to this increasingly popular format with Fujifilm's quality, reputation and support behind it."

About HDV format
HDV is an MPEG-2 compressed high-definition video format. The HDV format includes 720p (progressive) and 1080i (interlace) specifications, and enables the development of products conforming to the global high-definition infrastructure.

The HDV format records both video and audio through compression by MPEG encoding. Video signals are compressed by MPEG2 encoding (inter-frame compression) as BS digital broadcasting, making possible the recording and playback of high-definition video at a bit rate equivalent to the DV format SD (standard definition) specifications (intra-frame compression.) Audio signals are digitized with a 48kHz/16-bit sampling frequency and compressed to 384kbps by MPEG1 Audio Layer II encoding.

The HDV format also delivers improved error correction and special playback features. For example, by changing the error correction method from error correction within a track, as specified in the DV-SD format, to error correction among multiple tracks, the HDV format offers improved error correction capability and enhanced resistance to lost data caused by dropouts.

Fujifilm research and development teams in Japan and the United States continuously drive video and data storage innovation by building on internal expertise and the following core capabilities for advancing all types of current and future media:

Expertise with photosensitive material. Current and future optical disc technology will benefit from Fujifilm's unique photographic, audio and visual, data storage and optical media experience and knowledge to help identify new coating technologies critical to storing large amounts of data; Thin-film coating precision/advanced polymers. Fujifilm has perfected the process of applying layers of material down to the nano-scale level. Engineers continue to advance these precise techniques through years of manufacturing all types of media including motion picture and 35mm film, enterprise grade data storage media and small, consumer storage advances from the Zip disk to advances in current CD and DVD discs.
Fujifilm HDV tape will be available in early June 2006 through authorized Fujifilm Professional Video distributors.

About Fujifilm
Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc. is a subsidiary of Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. and delivers technology solutions to meet the imaging and information needs of retailers, consumers, professionals and business customers. As a global leader in digital imaging, Fujifilm pioneered the development of digital medical systems, and today is the leader in digital minilab systems. The company was ranked number 15 for U.S. patents granted during 2004, employs more than 75,000 people worldwide and in the year ending March 31, 2005, had global revenues of more than $23.6 billion.

In the United States, Fujifilm is a leader in delivering high quality, easy-to-use imaging and information solutions in the following categories: Digital Imaging Systems, Film and Imaging Systems, Recording/Storage Media, Motion Picture Film, Graphic Arts and Printing Systems and Medical Imaging and Diagnostics Systems. Fujifilm is an environmentally friendly, humane enterprise and an exemplary corporate citizen.

For more information on Fujifilm products, consumers can call 800-800-FUJI or access the Fujifilm USA Web site at www.fujifilm.com.

Consumers also can receive news and information direct from Fujifilm USA via RSS. Subscription is free at www.fujifilm.com/rss.
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 09:23 PM   #11
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From what I read on some reports from JVC technicians, JVC, Panasonic or FUJI tapes are the only ones you should use with the HD100. I'm using the cheapest JVC, I used lots of them so far and only one had some drop outs.
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 09:48 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Palmier
Sorry I forgot to tell you, for the time being I am filming in DV with the HD100 as my product will end on dvd for home users. I was trying to playback on another camera to save the running hours on th JVC.
wouldn't you be better off using hdv if you're ending up in dvd? the increased color info?
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