I want to do an interview with a solid white or black background. at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Open DV Discussion

Open DV Discussion
For topics which don't fit into any of the other categories.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old February 22nd, 2004, 02:51 PM   #1
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Richardson, TX
Posts: 842
I want to do an interview with a solid white or black background.

I'd like to shoot some interviews with completly solid white and black backgrounds.

If you've seen Queer Eye then you've seen the white example.

VH1 does a lot of interviews with complete black.

But it's not just like a black or white backdrop, it looks totally black.

How can I do this? If I put up a black backdrop, it catches some of the light and doesn't look right.

It almost looks like they were shot on a blue screen and keyed. But I don't know.

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

Thanks.
Bryan McCullough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 22nd, 2004, 04:08 PM   #2
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Northridge Ca
Posts: 734
To make your background blacker, get as much separation between your subject and the background as possible. Additionally, there is a black fabric called duvetyne that will suck up a lot of the ambient light and help give you a very black background. If you were to measure the amount of light hitting the background, it should be at least 1 stop less than your key light, and more like two stops, to give you a good black.

Finally, in post you can pull down your black levels even further quite easily. Unfortunately, in this country you have to pay attention to the 7.5 limit for blacks for broadcast, but this is not an issue unless you are going to broadcast.

You need good backlighting, or kickers, to give separation between the black background and your subjects, less dark hair or clothing melds into the background. For some examples, check the portrait shots at http://www.digitalprods.com/LSmontage

For white backgrounds, a good tip is to overexpose them by about two stops from your subject. Similar to burning out a window.

Wayne Orr, SOC
Wayne Orr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 22nd, 2004, 05:10 PM   #3
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Richardson, TX
Posts: 842
Thanks Wayne!

Lot of great info there.
Bryan McCullough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2004, 09:16 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Andalucia, Spain
Posts: 301
Make sure your white background is evenly lit. One light won't do. Use two, where the left light is pointing to the right of the background and the right light is pointing to the left of the background (they cross over to avoid hotspot in the middle). Don't overdo the background light either, to avoid flare across the subject. Two stops is just dandy. Make sure there are no creases in the sheet if you use a home made solution, they will show up (fatal!, we say in Spain).
__________________
Film & TV locations & production Spain
http://www.fotofilmvideo.com/
Dan Uneken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2004, 02:39 PM   #5
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NY
Posts: 37
im doing work on Queer Eye For The Straight Guy UK at the moment. For the white background interviews they are shot on green/ blue screen and altered to white in the edit.

Matthew
Matthew Laskey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2004, 02:50 PM   #6
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Andalucia, Spain
Posts: 301
Why on earth would one do it that roundabout way? Unless you have the green/blue background and no white.
__________________
Film & TV locations & production Spain
http://www.fotofilmvideo.com/
Dan Uneken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2004, 03:13 PM   #7
Trustee
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 1,707
It's probably so they have choices later on.

Murph
__________________
Christopher C. Murphy
Director, Producer, Writer
Christopher C. Murphy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2004, 04:30 PM   #8
Contributor
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 4,449
If you've got good chroma keying software, you can get a pure white background easier that way than lighting it. When I've done white backgrounds, though, I do it with a white cyc. As mentioned above, it must be evenly lighted, and I let it go about a full stop hotter than the foreground subject. For solid black, I aways use that fuzzy material called commando cloth they sell at theatrical supply houses. Get it far enough away and gobo off all your subject lights and it will be very black. As Wayne said, a good backlight on your subject is important when doing a black background. If you have a wall that you can paint, use flat black paint. I just use the commando cloth because I have some different sizes that I had sewn with grommets and all for hanging, and that's easier than painting the wall black.
Bill Pryor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2004, 04:32 PM   #9
Major Player
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Richardson, TX
Posts: 842
Quote:
Originally posted by Matthew Laskey
im doing work on Queer Eye For The Straight Guy UK at the moment. For the white background interviews they are shot on green/ blue screen and altered to white in the edit.
This is what I suspected.

Thanks for the info Matthew and I'd love to hear any production stories you've got from QE. Is it the same cast as the US or do you have your own local folks?
Bryan McCullough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2004, 08:12 PM   #10
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
If you're shooting with cheapish DV cameras, will there be problems with the fringes on highlights? On cheap cameras, 2 of the 3 primary colors will blow out. This causes the colors to go all weird.
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 2nd, 2004, 12:09 AM   #11
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Santa Rosa, California
Posts: 745
$700 cheapish or $3k cheapish?
__________________
Breakthrough In Grey Room

Shawn Mielke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 2nd, 2004, 11:47 PM   #12
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Even $3k "cheapish" cameras seem to have a problem with highlights.

Look at the footage at http://www.lafcpug.org/review_dvx_pd150.html
Notice in the flourescent light in the background, the fringes are cyan/magenta on the DVX100 and cyan on the PD150.
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Open DV Discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:18 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network