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Old October 14th, 2006, 11:27 PM   #16
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Hey,
I'm in Thailand too working on some stuff...

I'd seriously look to video first. With all the added problems over here of humidity, high temperature, etc...but biggest concern for me is "Mai Bpen Lai"...you know it over here as much as me. Thais will do something half a and then..."nevermind"...do you want some budget guy hired for pennies on the dollar running around with your film?

Plus quality developing, printing, etc over here is just as much if not more than in the states...talent is cheaper as are hired hands...but you have to hire more than in the states because they don't work well or can't think outside the box. You can hire some film school guy in the states that can do DP, editing, sound in a pinch...over here trying to get Thais to think outside what they know and stretch themselves is a pain.

Lastly why blow all that dough just to have film? It's not going to make it more successful...strong story, sets, lighting, etc will do that. Get a good video cam and invest all that money in lights, folks who know how to run those lights, good editing equipment and machines, decent talent, etc. I could stretch 100K pretty dang far over here if I wasn't trying to get film stock....

Paul
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Old October 15th, 2006, 06:47 AM   #17
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Thanks for the advice everyone.
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Old October 15th, 2006, 10:04 AM   #18
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An hour of 16mm filmstock, ~ $1500 USD
Processing an hour of 16mm film stock ~ $1500 USD

versus

An hour of premium DV tapestock ~ $25
Processing an hour of tapestock $00
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Old October 15th, 2006, 03:44 PM   #19
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Old October 16th, 2006, 06:26 PM   #20
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This is what it costs me, with a student discount, shooting 16mm...

For color: $80 for every 100 foot (3 mins)

B&W: $60 for every 100 foot

I used B&W Kodak Reversal and Kodachrome Color, both Tri-X. I get both projected as well (put on MiniDV tape).
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Old October 26th, 2006, 08:30 PM   #21
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An hour of 16mm filmstock, ~ $1500 USD
Processing an hour of 16mm film stock ~ $1500 USD

versus

An hour of premium DV tapestock ~ $25
Processing an hour of tapestock $00

-----------

Of course, super16mm looks great, and DV looks like....
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Old October 26th, 2006, 08:59 PM   #22
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On top of processing you've got the cost of transfer to tape and that tape stock cost, as well as shipping the film to and from the lab, not to mention the cost of syncing up the sound.
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Old October 27th, 2006, 12:34 AM   #23
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I shoot 16mm film on an Arriflex 16bl. Here's some of the costs I have when shooting:

- 400ft of Kodak Vision2 250D 7205 Color Neg is around $80 retail.
- I really love Kodak Double-X 200 7222 b&w as well.

- Processing is roughly .16 / foot, so about $64 per 400foot reel, plus the postage to get it there and back.

- Telecine charges will vary greatly depending if it's supervised, scene-by-scene color corrected or just one-light throughout. I've seen telecine for one-light around .15 / ft and scene-to-scene around .18/ft. Supervised is expensive, say $100-150/hr.

Ways to save some cash - Buy short ends or recans of film. Always cheaper than retail reels, but not always easy to track down. 35mm will probably be easier to find than 16mm in short ends.

Of course, these are just some of the actual film costs. Hiring a DP and a crew is many many times these costs. I shoot all of my own film, but then again I was trained in photography, so it's an easy jump. If you're not so familiar with f-stops and light meters, you might have some trouble at first. Good luck. FIlm is a wonderful medium, much more expressive than digital. Not everyone wants to tread those dangerous waters.... but it's usually worth it :)
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Old October 27th, 2006, 12:41 AM   #24
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--Derek, where are you buying your film man!! You're getting ripped off!!

100' reels should cost $30 at the very most. 400' should be arouns $80-90 ea. Call kodak or fuji and get a better deal!

--Oh, and Steve and hour of 16mm is not $1500 :)

400ft = 11min at 24fps
400ft kodak color neg film = ~$80

6 cans of 400ft (2400feet = 66min) @ $80/can = $480

Processing:

2400 feet @ .16 / foot = $384

So you're looking at roughly $865 to shoot and process 66 min of 16mm film. Not too bad:P
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Old October 27th, 2006, 11:50 AM   #25
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I thought I read somewhere that the cost of silver is going way up and Kodak and Fuji where having to raise their prices.
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Old October 27th, 2006, 12:02 PM   #26
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shoot digital....save yourslef lot of money that can be put toward the story and art direction etc..... and especially since u dont know much about filmmaking other than what looks good. If i was in your shoes i'd shoot digital HVX or somthing...
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Old October 27th, 2006, 09:48 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Winchester
FIlm is a wonderful medium, much more expressive than digital.
That depends. I've never had so much fun with photography since digital cameras came along, since I can now afford to experiment to my heart's content. As digital video cameras get better the same will increasingly be true for movie-making, especially since most film footage ends up getting digitally processed these days anyway. Bits created digitally from the start won't be any less expressive than bits converted to digital from film, once the digital cameras are good enough.
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Old October 27th, 2006, 10:48 PM   #28
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Sure, it depends on your opinion and experience. I love both formats for their particular uses. More tools for the toolbox.
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Old October 28th, 2006, 07:25 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean J. Manning
I do not know anything about cameras. I know what I want frames to look like. I know what shots I want. In my mind, I can picture the entire movie from start to finish.
If you know nothing about cameras, then before you worry about 16mm vs 35mm film stocks etc. you should grab a video camera and go and shoot some test scenes with your actors, so that you learn more about cameras and their limitations. Don't just hope your DoP will do it all for you. Everyone can picture a film in their head, but everyone finds that things are a bit different when they are actually on set.
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Old October 29th, 2006, 05:30 AM   #30
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DP Bangkok

Hi Sean i am a DP based in Bangkok , give me a call sometime if you have some more questions +66868821620 , my last short i shot here on 35mm can be viewed at http://www.myspace.com/105058870.

I recommend for you to shoot on HD either the F900 or Varicam because of your budget , i can get some great deals here on equipment and crew.
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