A Basic Step By Step White Balance/18% Grey at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Photon Management
Shine an ever-loving light on you.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 9th, 2005, 09:08 AM   #1
Tourist
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2
A Basic Step By Step White Balance/18% Grey

Hi everyone. I'm working on a documentary for the next three months where I will not have any control over lighting issues. This means I'll constantly have to Custom White Balance. I'll be using my new DVX-100a and also a little cheap panasonic that I bought a year ago. The film is a road trip film, the small camera has a little wide angle lens adapter on it, so that it can be placed in the car's dash and show both myself and the other person on the trip. The rest of it will be filmed with the dvx. Anyways I've been to film school and have kept up on this and a few of the other forums, but since I am new to this camera I'd love to have anyone and everyone give me some hints and tips- if not straight instructions on how to best make my original footage match up as closely as possible. Also a lot of the film will be on the fly, so the less I mess up now the better. I don't have a "true" white board, when I got my 18% yesterday I thought it would have it on the other side but it didn't. I'm going to a shop right now though to see if they have one.

What I'm hoping is that between the 18% and white balancing, that if I select a film speed, and assuming that the DVX is a certain ASA(I've read that it's somewhere just under 400) that I can get away without metering.

Thank you in advance I can't wait to read everyone's comments. Also if anyone would like more info on the film simply ask or email and you can also check out my progress at
http://brian.takats.net
Brian Takats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 9th, 2005, 04:16 PM   #2
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Vilseck, Germany
Posts: 89
Hi Brian. From a technical aspect, it might be impossible to closely match two very different cameras without a lot of test shots and tweeking (in camera and during post production). Having said that, you can come comfortably close by simply making sure both cameras are white balanced at the same source from the same angle at the same time. It doesn't have to be a $40 white card, matte photo paper will do the same job. The important thing is that both cameras have a completely identical reference.

If you want to get into some serious camera matching, you could conduct some test shoots using calibrated color charts and take them to an engineer who knows how to read a vectorscope and waveform monitor. He may be able to tweak the DVX100 to look like the cheap camera. (If you can get the cheap camera to look like the DVX100, Panasonic is in trouble.

The most important trick to get the audience not to notice camera cuts is to to have a very interesting script. Not a technical answer, but its often overlooked. If the audience is not buying the story, it won't matter if you're using Varicams. Tests prove that image quality takes a back seat to good story telling every time. Have fun and good luck!

Steve
Steve Roark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 9th, 2005, 06:19 PM   #3
Tourist
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2
Actually

I guess my question was really only directed at and about how to properly expose the DVX without metering, and basic instructions on how to do so. As far as my cheapo panasonic I'm really unconcerned with that footage matching, it is obvious that it is from a different source, and that's how I want it to be. I just really need help with my DVX. Essentially what should I do each time I turn the camera on in each lighting situation. I know that's a fairly ambiguous question but I would love someone to harrangue me with some specifics and knowledge.

1.) what is the ASA of my camera? was I right a little under 400?
2.) Does anyone actually reccomend me using 24p, since a lot of my shots will be exteriors and landscapes? It seems that 60 would make more sense.
3.) I would like to use 24p when I am doing interviews, they will be stationary shots, so will it look okay(compared to the obvious video look of the exteriors.
4.) How do I use an 18% grey? Is it primarily for color balance in post?

Thanks again~!
Brian Takats is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 9th, 2005, 06:42 PM   #4
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,750
Hey Brian,

I have a little information on exposure at my website.
http://www.glennchan.info/video/exposure/exposure.htm

Don't focus on whether to expose aggressively or conservatively but understand the differences between the two.

My results do not apply to your camera. The DVX100 can get a lot more complicated that the Sony PD100, because the DVX100 has lots of settings. In particular, the cinegamma gamma mode gives greater exposure latitude and you'll want to color correct that in post.

Once you figure out the optimal exposure for your camera (may be dependent on the scene):
You want to figure out how exposure correlates to what you see in the LCD/viewfinder and the zebra stripes.
One thing in particular to watch out for is viewing angle to the DVX100 LCD. You have to be right on- otherwise the colors will change. Or you may prefer to look at the LCD with a slight angle, as that may give slightly increased exposure range in the LCD (haven't tried this).
Watch out for glare on the lcd, you can block sunlight off if that is a problem (i.e. your hands, or gaffer tape + black matte paper).

Quote:
2.) Does anyone actually reccomend me using 24p, since a lot of my shots will be exteriors and landscapes? It seems that 60 would make more sense.
Try shooting at different frame rates and judge for yourself.

Pick something with high motion, like pans or handheld (and the camera operator is walking).

Quote:
3.) I would like to use 24p when I am doing interviews, they will be stationary shots, so will it look okay(compared to the obvious video look of the exteriors.
Mixed frame rates may get slightly annoying during editing, or maybe not.
Glenn Chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 15th, 2005, 04:38 PM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 493
Brian,

For "exteriors and landscapes," wide shots I'll assume, you will want progressive scan for the higher resolution to capture the details.

What model is the little Panasonic that you have? If it's a GS400, that has good manual controls and picture adjustments, and I have been able to match it with a DVX100 without much trouble.

Your little camera probably can't do 24p, so what is you plan for incorporating that footage if you shoots exteriors and interviews in 24p?

Josh
__________________
Owner/Operator, 727 Records
Co-Founder, Matter of Chance Productions
Blogger, Try Avoidance
Joshua Provost is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > The Tools of DV and HD Production > Photon Management

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:37 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network