Filming with your camera attached to the roof of a car? - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

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Old September 1st, 2002, 06:20 AM   #16
Woodyfang
 
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Location: London/Nicosia
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yeh a pickup truck sounds cool!

Unfortunately they are a bit harder to come by in London than BMW's!

The car (convertible BMW) has quite a nice trans-tion from back seats to boot, So I'll probably lie the camera person accross there on their belly.

Just realised the car will be quite full with a camerperson, someone to secure the cameraperson, Driver, and spotter to make sure the driver doesn't run over the skater and navigate the route. Can't wait!
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Old September 13th, 2002, 03:54 PM   #17
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Car Mount

Hey Dirk,
this may be a little late, and if so- I apologize.
I heard of a car-mount technique years ago from a guy in San Fran (Dick Riezner).

1. You take a long piece of wood, like a 2x6- or maybe smaller for a DVcam.
2. put a couple of dirt bags underneath on each side to protect the car surface
3. Use bungie cords around each of the ends, and hook firmly into the tire wells or door wells whichever the case.
4. you'll need to then mount the head off of the tripod onto the middle of the board with a "hihat", or well, I dont know what you are using for tripods so you can fill in the blank here. Just mount the tripod head to the board.

make sure everything is firm!!!

Good luck,

Jeff Patnaude
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Old September 13th, 2002, 07:07 PM   #18
Woodyfang
 
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that sounds like a fun idea, althpugh i have tonsay the explanation was a little confusing, I didn't understand the instructions.

crikey!

please xplain better now
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Old September 14th, 2002, 03:25 AM   #19
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Thanks mac,

I sort of get it. Only the last piece concerning the "Hilat" was a little misty for me.

Please explain this.
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Old September 14th, 2002, 04:04 AM   #20
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shoot

woody

you also might consider another skater with a fisheye, a guy on a board with a fisheye following would be good..........just .02 from a former skater

<<<-- Originally posted by Woodyfang : that sounds like a fun idea, althpugh i have tonsay the explanation was a little confusing, I didn't understand the instructions.

crikey!

please xplain better now -->>>
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Old September 14th, 2002, 05:06 AM   #21
Woodyfang
 
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yeh i'd like to do that, especially as i love the low angle shot, with the camera really close to the ground, showing the skaters two back feet and their board.

However I'll be doing this on a longboard, which is basically a fast skateboard! I dont know anyone else with a long board, let alone a cameraman on a long board who would be able to keep up!

I think I might set up a shot especially for a skating cameraman, whcih could then be woven into the rest of the footage
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Old September 14th, 2002, 10:44 PM   #22
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Hi guys,
really sorry if the instructions were hard to understand. I'll try to be more clear. I also have access to equipment because I work at a studio. I realize not everyone has dirtbags, or hihats.
A hihat is a short metal tripod-like thing about a foot high and mounted on a 1 foot square piece of wood. You attach the head of a tripod on it and clamp it to the top of ladders, or where ever you need to put a camera in a different place. Okay:

1. take a couple of pillows and lay on top of the hood of a car.
2. lay a 2x6 piece of wood across the hood, on top of the pillows. The ends should be pointing out over each of the front tires.
3. take two bungie cords. lay the bungie cord on the end of the wood, centered.
draw both ends down pulling the wood firmly against the pillow/hood, and hook both ends on the wheel well. Wrap the bungie once or twice to get proper tightness. Repeat on the other side.
4. Remove the head from your tripod and mount in the center of the piece of wood. Sorry if thats not more specific- I dont know what type of tripods people are using.

we would use a "hihat" and just screw it into the center of the board- your mileage may vary.

This is the board-rig that the Farley brothers used for "Raising Arizona" floating shots also. FYI

Hope this is at least marginally helpful.

Jeff Patnaude
patnaude at mindspring dot com
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Old September 26th, 2002, 06:42 PM   #23
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When I was purchasing my Cobra Crane, the salesman said that he has a customer that mounts one in the back of his pickup and drives at high speed on the LA freeways.

The crane allows him to place the camera low at the rear for action that is following the truck and look forward over the truck cab to get action that the truck follows. Plus they can drop it over the side (The camera end) and get shots from those angles as well.

I think they may have a pan/tilt head on the crane head too.
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