Starting your own business or keepin' that 9-5 staff position? - Page 2 at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Taking Care of Business

Taking Care of Business
The pen and paper aspects of DV -- put it in writing!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old June 19th, 2008, 05:53 AM   #16
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
having been both self employed and working from my home since 1971, I can say the most important thing is to be disciplined about your work. It's easy to fall into the dark hole of morning TV and saying to yourself, 'I'll just watch this program and then get to work editing' or whatever you need to do.
As for not being considered a serious business because you work from home...perhaps 20 years ago but today there are so many home based businesses and even some of the top 500 have people working from home that I haven't found it to be a problem. AAMOF, most of the video and still people I know over the last 10 years in particular work from home.
You have to set aside a dedicated area that is just for business, office, viewing room, whatever and again be disciplined and very importantly, if you treat it a serious business so will everyone else.
Some years ago I knew a news freelancer whose office was his car. That's it. No home office, no building, no nothing but him, his camera, his scanners,his cell phone, his car and of course his list of people to call at all the network affiliates. He made a whole lot of money and was considered to be on of the best news video journalists around. In his car.
Pretty serious stuff. He did OK. Treat it like a business.

Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 19th, 2008, 06:24 AM   #17
Major Player
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Piper City, IL
Posts: 341
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Bloom View Post
I can say the most important thing is to be disciplined about your work.
I think that's the key right there. A lot of people I know like the idea of setting their own hours, being their own boss, etc, but don't have the self-discipline.

I've been in transition for a while, building my own business while working my 9-5, and I'd say the discipline of it is the hardest thing. Right now I get up at 5:55, edit until 9, jet to my day job, work until 5, come home, eat, spend some time with my wife and kid, start working again around 6:30, and usually work until 10:00 or 11:00. I take Sundays and Wednesday nights off, and that's pretty much it.

There've been many days where I've been dead tired by the end of the day and wondering if it's all worth it, but I feel like the rewards are there and worth working for.
Philip Gioja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 25th, 2008, 03:37 PM   #18
Major Player
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 422
Regarding working from home, I agree that it takes discipline and setting aside your workspace. I'm not always great at the discipline part - but I start the day with a day planner and go from there.
The big problem working from home is that your work chases you and it's always there. I found it necessary to create a separation. Since my apt is small and had no second bedroom or suitable area, I set up working space in an armoire that can be closed to make it go away. Before that, it was an open corner desk that you see when you wake up at 3am and it never went away. Which isn't really efficient because your time isn't segmented - you work a little here, a little there, or continuously and it turns into one long stream rather than a segmented workday.

I too have a friend who is able to talk on her job and will call and chat for two hours - so I'm learning to not pick up the phone when I have something scheduled to do and to call her back after working hours.

And that morning TV is a killer so I really watch that - start my day with CNN and a bowl of cereal, but then force myself to turn it off and focus on my plans for the day.

Sometimesit's helpful to get physically out of the house - go on a drive somewhere else, take the day planner, and get focused on what needs to be done - physically going somewhere else helps to break up that endless stream mentioned earlier.

I'm still gettting the marketing part down about the business -having some difficulties with that right now - and I have a second business that is helping to get me by - but I hate that and want to make the transition.
Kell Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 25th, 2008, 06:18 PM   #19
Inner Circle
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,609
setting a daily schedule is very important and lot of it depends on what type of person you are. What I mean is, I.E., I['m an early morning person. I generally start editing by about 6:30-7:00AM and am usually done for the day by 4PM. I take a lunch break about 12 or 12:30 and use that time to clear my head. I also return social calls then. Thank goodness for caller ID. I also work into my schedule my "play dates". I'm an avid golfer (not good just avid) and schedule that in every Wedsnesday AM EARLY Tee time. So then I adjust my schedule to fit. If I'm out of town as I was last week for 5 days I adjust around that and then I will sit down when I get home and pound away until I'm where I need to be. While rendering I answer emails, do paperwork etc. For me it's important to keep to a schedule but I also remain flexible with it. For instance, my daughter -in-law had my 3rd grandchild on Tuesday about 1AM. While I was there my wife was so I knew I'd be going to visit in the morning. I worked for 3 hours then went to see my new grandkid then went back to the office to work. I workked a bit later to make up the time.
Discipline yourself but be flexible. Don't lock yourself in - keep the flexibility in the schedule you need to 1) make the business work and 2) not go down the dark hole of all work and no play. Maybe it's my age but if I don't play a bit I go nuts and get very cranky. My wife doesn't like cranky and after almost 40 years with her I figure I'd better keep her happy or she might not renew my contract ;-)
Be FLEXIBLE!

O | O
\__/

Don
Don Bloom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2008, 08:32 AM   #20
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Salisbury, MD
Posts: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Bloom View Post
h It's easy to fall into the dark hole of morning TV and saying to yourself, 'I'll just watch this program and then get to work editing' or whatever you need to do.
Don
All right all right....I'm going!! Just one more post..

Mick Haensler
Higher Ground Media
Mick Haensler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2008, 08:45 AM   #21
Major Player
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Pembrokeshire, Wales
Posts: 734
On the other hand, you need to rest your eyes from the computer monitor for ten minutes every hour - my rule is no food or drink anywhere near the computer, so I have to go to the kitchen to make and drink the coffee or whatever, maybe switch the TV on for a while so that I'm focussing on something further away.

Oh for a few more hours each week so I could spend some time on photography/video stuff instead of just sneaking into this forum from time to time!
__________________
Canon XH A1; Canon XF100; Nikon D800
Annie Haycock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2008, 08:55 AM   #22
Major Player
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: mahopac, NY
Posts: 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mick Haensler View Post
All right all right....I'm going!! Just one more post..

Mick Haensler
Higher Ground Media
yeah...that's my downfall...the internet (when I should be editing). I think if I were paying rent on an office, I'd stick closer to set hours and stay more focused on work while in the office...save the internet time to when I got back home.
__________________
www.AbsoluteMotionVideo.com
Mike Meyerson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2008, 09:03 AM   #23
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 118
This is a great thread! I work both the freelance side and 9-6 side of videography.

Freelance: You're often the "out of the box" opinion businesses look for. You're the expert and your ideas and suggestions are often highly valued.

9-6er: It doesn't matter that you're an expert. You're an employee and your ideas don't matter. Just do what you're told. But if your ideas are good you won't get credit.

Freelance: You often have to play many roles, the videographer, editor, marketer, accountant, and sometimes the collection agency. If you're weak in any of these areas then your business suffers.

9-6er: You're one thing, and that's it. No matter what you still get a paycheck.

The best advice I can give is that you need to know both worlds. Expierence is the best advertisement. If you go into business for yourself, find a niche. Wedding videos may be a saturated market in your area but maybe no one is doing corporate stuff or little league games, etc. Research will help you realize what looks to be the best path.
Edward Phillips is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2008, 10:19 AM   #24
Regular Crew
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Salisbury, MD
Posts: 122
Hey...for all you guys and gals working at home that "occasionally" fall into the procrastination rut, how about a daily "get yer @#$ in gear motivational thread!!!

Mick Haensler
Higher Ground Media
Mick Haensler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 17th, 2008, 02:33 PM   #25
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Posts: 425
I was in a presentation at the regular 9-5 job today. All about the latest Oracle database management tools.

During the presentation I kept thinking that if some magical guide appeared and said 'Dennis, this crap is what the rest of your professional life will be about.' then I would respond, 'Thanks for the tip. I'll go slash my wrists now.'

Oh, I exaggerate, but one of those days.
Dennis Stevens is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > And Now, For Something Completely Different... > Taking Care of Business

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:59 AM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network