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Old December 21st, 2010, 02:25 PM   #1
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DSLR Shooters - Have you ever had a 'turf' problem with the photographer?

I read a report on another forum about a photographer who was so upset with the videographer's 5D and 7D cameras that he walked off the job accusing the videographer of taking photos. Have you ever encountered this?
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Old December 21st, 2010, 03:19 PM   #2
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have to say that to me THAT sounds more like and ego problem than a picture problem. Perhaps the photogs name was Prima Donna.
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Old December 21st, 2010, 04:18 PM   #3
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He probably had "Lens Envy".
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Old December 21st, 2010, 04:54 PM   #4
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I always make sure I talk to the photographer and explain that we're only there for video - no photos - and that I have no reason to take photos because that's what they are being paid for and I'm being paid for video.
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Old December 21st, 2010, 06:51 PM   #5
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Yeah but when you walk in with the same or better gear than the photog and that photog has lens envy, is a prima donna or just has a self esteem problem they will always feel threatened that you're doing stills while doing video with your new HDSLR. Whether you are or not isn't the point the threat is there in the photographers mind and that's all that he/she sees or thinks about.

Regardless, I always talk to the photogs as well but since I'm not shooting HDSLRs and I've been working with a lot of the same folks for at least the last 10 years we're more likely to really help each other out than worry about who's shooting what.
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Old December 21st, 2010, 07:43 PM   #6
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Jim,

I absolutely had this problem with a photog last summer when we met at the rehearsal. He saw the 5d and started blaming me for the couple reducing their package from 6k to 3k. He actually said he didn't want me covering the photo shoot with the camera (5d), so I agreed to use my XL H1 only for that part.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 12:06 AM   #7
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Whenever I read reports like these I am more firmly convinced that the future prospects for still wedding photographers are severely time-limited and that the complainants recognise this.

What will they do when video cameras have such high spec imaging devices that the couple can choose from any of 25/30 pictures a second to have enlarged to any size they wish?
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 06:08 AM   #8
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I think the main difference will remain in the lighting. Photographers usually light with strobe, but they only have to light for an instant. of course, video requires a longer duration.

As a photographer, I would not be intimated by someone showing up with better gear than me. It actually happens more often than I'd like to admit. The difference is usually in their knowledge of lighting. Even if they have an external flash, it's aimed right at the subject so they achieve that nice deer-in-the-headlights look, all the while chuckling at me for not having my flash aimed straight ahead (I usually bounce the flash or light off-camera or a combo)..

It boils down to this: as long as the folks with the DSLRs are not shooting over my shoulder, firing off my strobes with their own Pocket Wizards, it's all good!

Here's another question: as a videographer, would you be intimidated by a photographer showing up with a video rig?

I look forward to an affordable 'super cam' that will adequately fill both requirements for still and motion. It should level the playing field quite nicely, but I don't see how it will eliminate the need for two distinct approaches to coverage
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 01:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Snow View Post
photographer who was so upset with the videographer's 5D and 7D cameras that he walked off the job accusing the videographer of taking photos. Have you ever encountered this?
It is absolutely unprofessional and irresponsible to walk away from the job, looks like the guy is working hard on destroying his own business. Mistakes like this can cost you years of your company reputation recovery; and I know examples here in Toronto when people lost about 75% of their jobs after one big screwdup.
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Originally Posted by Dave Partington View Post
I always make sure I talk to the photographer and explain that we're only there for video - no photos - and that I have no reason to take photos because that's what they are being paid for and I'm being paid for video.
Same here, and even when family members seeing me with photo camera ask me to take a picture I never do that, even though 80% of the cases my equipment is more advanced, , I politely explain them that I am a 'video guy' and refer them to photographer.
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Originally Posted by Ken Diewert View Post
photog last summer when we met at the rehearsal. He saw the 5d and started blaming me for the couple reducing their package from 6k to 3k. He actually said he didn't want me covering the photo shoot with the camera (5d), so I agreed to use my XL H1 only for that part.
Never happened to me, but that would be very interesting discussion with photographer about what equipment I should and shouldn’t use in my production, I use one or another camera because i think it is more appropriate for the situation and to get a shot that i need, and not because photographer want, or doesn't want me to use it
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Originally Posted by Philip Howells View Post
What will they do when video cameras have such high spec imaging devices that the couple can choose from any of 25/30 pictures a second to have enlarged to any size they wish?
Theoretically, I believe it'll be possible soon, but not without photography background and deep photoshop knowledge, a lot of 'magic' is done in post
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Originally Posted by Jason Ryman View Post
Here's another question: as a videographer, would you be intimidated by a photographer showing up with a video rig?
No. Equipment i use is good, but sometimes I work with photographer that brings RED along with his Nikons and Canons; last summer big Indian wedding he had 2 REDs on set, and he is not just a guy with expensive camera, to make things worse, being amazing photographer he is miles better camera man than I am, but I just do the best I can and if there is an opportunity to learn - I always try not to miss it.
sorry for such a long and messy post:)

But most importantly i wanted to thank everyone in the community for invaluable knowledge I find every time on this forum pages,
and wish to everyone Very Very Merry Merry Christmas and Happy 2011 season!
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 01:46 PM   #10
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I

Here's another question: as a videographer, would you be intimidated by a photographer showing up with a video rig?
IMO, this scenario can not be reversed . we all know that videos are the ones catching up in terms of bride's priority, prices, and quality relative to photography.

the reason why photographers are intimidated because they are not used to it yet. i.e. dslrs, glidecams, sliders and cranes on a wedding. Ones they do, I think we can all work together as a team instead of competing.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 03:59 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Ken Diewert View Post
Jim,

I absolutely had this problem with a photog last summer when we met at the rehearsal. He saw the 5d and started blaming me for the couple reducing their package from 6k to 3k. He actually said he didn't want me covering the photo shoot with the camera (5d), so I agreed to use my XL H1 only for that part.
You let the photographer determine which equipment you used?? I'd tell him to kiss my...
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 05:09 PM   #12
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sounds like the photographer is being too in-confidence in his photography skill and knowledge.

By the same token, similar thing happened to me not too long ago. I was the videographer for a wedding, but sometime I do take pictures during the wedding even through I was only paid for the video job. But the photographer came up to me and insist that he is the only photographer for the wedding and I do not have permission to take pictures, and if I want to use his picture, he can give it to me with his logo on it. I just laughed at it and said sure, whatever.

The funny thing is that almost half of the guest have their dslr or powershot taking pictures. Well, but what bother me is that while I was following the couple's limo to a picture site, I was waiting outside the limo so I can capture that moment. However, the photographer was inside using his 5d filming the wedding party dancing in the limo. I was quite upset but I didn't say anything because he was using a 70-200 zoom lens on a tripod. Even for a Limo, the 70-200 is over kill in such a tight space, all he could capture is the couple. Fortunately I have two cameras ready, one with Tokina 11-16 and Canon 16-35 on a crop.

On the other hand, thinking from his perspective, he was just doing his job and trying to make the best of it. Also, while many people know how to take pictures, but for video, not everyone has the time and patient to edit the footage. And there is no reason for me to make him an enemy.

But honestly, sometime photographers are quite difficult to work with even through their job is usually a lot easier and more mobile. Many times they have no idea if they are blocking and standing in front of the camera for mins.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 05:52 PM   #13
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The key with this situation, as always, is communication. If you're going to be working with a photographer you haven't worked with before, then a quick call to them before the wedding can solve all sorts of issues. I've been advocating this approach for years. It's an effective and professional approach and will make your life so much easier on the wedding day.

As for any situation where a photographer was threatening to leave or refusing to allow me to cover any portion of the day or attempting to dictate what equipment I could or couldn't use ... let's just say that would not happen. Extend a professional hand to other vendors but do not allow them to walk over you.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 08:36 PM   #14
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The key with this situation, as always, is communication. If you're going to be working with a photographer you haven't worked with before, then a quick call to them before the wedding can solve all sorts of issues. I've been advocating this approach for years. It's an effective and professional approach and will make your life so much easier on the wedding day.

As for any situation where a photographer was threatening to leave or refusing to allow me to cover any portion of the day or attempting to dictate what equipment I could or couldn't use ... let's just say that would not happen. Extend a professional hand to other vendors but do not allow them to walk over you.
Travis hit the nail on the head.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 09:25 PM   #15
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At the start of each wedding i make a point of introducing myself to the tog and explaining the fact im using dlsr for video, reactions vary, but I've only had one make a fuss

(he later apologised stating the previous wedding's videographer had an assistant who was taking stills with a dslr and later tried to sell an album to the B&G)

I know about 70% of the togs in market now, but I still bump into the odd one I've never met.

A bit of a pet peeve of mine, the tog NEVER makes the effort to come and introduce him/herself to me, NEVER.

I've experimented a few times and held back my instincts to go and say hello first, thinking they'll eventually make the effort, how naive i was.

And I'm a pleasant, approachable guy!
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