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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...


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Old March 8th, 2006, 11:27 AM   #16
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv...per/031222.htm
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Old March 8th, 2006, 01:34 PM   #17
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I think the use of body mounted or handheld stabilizers depends on the client....the guests...the venue....there's so much going on to factor the decision in on this one. If you are in confined space...I would nix the stabilizer.



If you want to "really" change the lame perception that many see in wedding videographers....and get the rates up.

A. Learn to shoot quality footage before entering the wedding arena, w/o shaking the camera
B. Stop using those big lights or lights in general at weddings/receptions....this is the funny one, a company calls themsleves "unobtrusive" but they use blinding lights...go figure.
C. Stop crowding folks w/ your camera, and getting in their faces...they really love that.
D. Learn to edit, know when to cut and not to cut

These are just the basics, but many wedding videographers work I see is not worth what they are charging....and definately not worth more. Until more people follow some of those rules.....the wedding videographer will carry the stigma for while. Don't believe me.....visit this site in 5 more years and see how things have changed.....yeah, there will be better gear owned and nicer work stations....but my above list will still be prominent.


The ratio of good photographers to bad photographers is much higher than the wedding videographers.....meaning, I see A LOT more good wedding photography than I do wedding videography...and not only cuz there's more photographers, not at all......you can see the difference in "talent".....where many wedding videographers lack.






Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Bennett
Lowell absolutely with you on the "business first" philosophy. For the industry as a whole business is not good. Photographers get 2 or 3x the money for a fraction of the work and investment. Photographers are (typically) perceived as cool, wedding videographers as dorks. Changing this perception is vital to the long term health of this industry.

edit: Patrick just saw your post, do not want to hijack your thread.

Last edited by Joe Allen Rosenberger; March 8th, 2006 at 02:20 PM.
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Old March 8th, 2006, 08:50 PM   #18
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When I first used a stabilizer (one of the first "DV" stabilizers whose name I forget), people made "Aliens" comments frequently. This was closer to the time that movie came out and camera stabilizers were used to mount prop weapons which had a big visual impact in the movie. I doubt you guys get these comments as it has been so long since the movie was in theaters.

You may have noticed in other threads that I don't use a steadycam-type rig anymore, but I will say that you shouldn't avoid using a device because it makes you look like a dork. Nobody will see you on the video. What is important is learning to avoid, when possible, getting in the way of guests. People won't mind you if you are doing your job professionally. There is a zone of personal space that you should avoid as often as possible. This space is obviously in an area where people are viewing. If you sneak behind the best man and shoot over his shoulder in a tight location (outside gazebo wedding), nobody will be pissed. If you stand 10 feet away from the bride and groom in a church with a large span between the pews and the altar, you will get "stinkeye" from everyone. In churches, my personal rule is to stand as close as possible, but to minimize my visual impact. Some churches even allow shooting from the sides of the altar behind the couple. I often shoot kneeling in the aisle from a few rows behind the parents. If I have to move farther back, I don't need to kneel. Being far up the aisle allows a wide shot with the parents facing the B&G and then to zoom in for the kiss while remaining steady. Most of the time, I show a three-shot of the B&G with minister and a medium with they and the best man and maid of honor. I always get a cutaway of both sides of the wedding party, and an establishing wide of everything.

All of the above-mentioned shots can be done with a stabilizer, though shooting over the best-man's shoulder can be difficult if he is tall. The only problem is that it may be difficult to crouch down far up the aisle and still get a good shot. If you can keep the camera at least 3.5 or 4 feet off the ground (1.2meters?) with your particular stabilzer while kneeling, I would recommend this shot. Then, when everyone stands at the end, you stand and shoot the kiss. When the couple walks out, track them from about 10-15 feet away. Be careful as some couples walk too fast and you will be walking backwards.

In all this, the person you will have conflict with will be the photographer. A professional photographer will stand right next to you and you will coordinate your shots. It is good to give your shot plan to them before the ceremony starts. I have only had a problem with one photographer and he refuses to go into the aisle and shoot with me. Fortunately for those couples who hire him, his assistants will get the job done using long lenses from seats along the aisle. By working with the other professional photographers, I have built up a decent rapport with some of the best.

I think the real question should be when NOT to use a stabilizer. If a church has extreme requirements and you won't be able to move around, you may as well use a tripod. If you must shoot from the balcony, a tripod is the logical choice.
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Old March 12th, 2006, 08:24 PM   #19
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I'm hearing from a top 5 photographer in Hong Kong who moved from videography to photograph he said doing photography earn alot more and does not have to spend as much time editing. People do pay more for photographer than videographer since they still have the thinking of photo is better than a dvd. But I think the wedding business both videography and photography do get you earning alot of money when you are famous.

This may sound very offencing to some people but keeping the business running very smoothly and spend time to get client is more important than the qualitity of the work. Since without any client coming to you than you won't even be able to show ur past work. But having the quality is where big money will come pouring in.
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Old March 12th, 2006, 08:50 PM   #20
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yeah.....and that's like saying Im hearing that a dentist makes more money than a photographer...so what, a lwayer makes more money than a starbucks manager....on and on and on.....zzzzzz
what strange post.....



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricki Lau
I'm hearing from a top 5 photographer in Hong Kong who moved from videography to photograph he said doing photography earn alot more and does not have to spend as much time editing. People do pay more for photographer than videographer since they still have the thinking of photo is better than a dvd. But I think the wedding business both videography and photography do get you earning alot of money when you are famous.

This may sound very offencing to some people but keeping the business running very smoothly and spend time to get client is more important than the qualitity of the work. Since without any client coming to you than you won't even be able to show ur past work. But having the quality is where big money will come pouring in.
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