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Canon EOS Crop Sensor for HD
APS-C sensor cameras including the 80D, 70D, 7D Mk. II, 7D, EOS M and Rebel models for HD video recording.


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Old August 12th, 2010, 02:09 PM   #1
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7d quality ?

I watch videos on the 7d and I see stunning hd quality, but when i go and shot video with my stock 7d I always wonder why my video dosen't come out the way I know it can. The only time I can see my 7d quality is on a nice sunny day other then that i get noise. I know you can't just turn it on and shot and expect to get professional looking results. So my Q is what is the KEY to unlocking the stunning quality is it ISO- DO I CRANK MY SHUTTER FOR OVER EXPOSED LIGHTING -APERTURE.......Etc?
I previously owned a canon xl2 so Im new to the DSLR video world

I have one ND filter
It's a stock lens

ANY HELP WOULD BE GREAT!
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Old August 12th, 2010, 02:13 PM   #2
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Fast glass, great subject and learn to use the tools you have.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 02:25 PM   #3
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If you mean by "stock" lens the "kit" lens that came with the camera that would be the first place you need to start. They are usually not very fast and not very good and can really limit what you can produce in low light. They work just fine during the day outside, but other than that they are very limited.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 02:55 PM   #4
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First thing to do is turn off everything automatic. Make sure auto shutter is off, as well as auto iris, auto white balance. If you're shooting at 1080p24, the shutter speed should be 1/50. Use an ND filter to control light outdoors. Shoot at the lower ISOs. White balance for the conditions. I use the Neutral setup, modified for what I do. You might want to check the different setups. That could be one thing you're not liking.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 03:08 PM   #5
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I will recommend the same thing here I recommend for many who are not only new to DSLRs, but new to the concept of non-automatic camera control.

Try to take a course in basic photography at the local college of community college. You will learn a TON there about controlling your camera, understanding light and shadow, exposure, all the things that go into making a nice picture.

Video is nothing but a series of still pictures, so all the lessons you learn will directly translate over to shooting video.

In my opinion, this is the single best investment you could make in improving the quality of your work. It shouldn't cost too much either. Certainly cheaper than buying lights or fast lenses.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 04:38 PM   #6
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i was in the same boat when I first bought my 7d, but the more you can control it and plan what you want, the more rewarding it will be.

Video cameras are a little easier to get the right focus and exposure, but DSLR take a bit more work, but you will be more rewarded for the work you put in.

In editing time, I've saved heaps compared to HDV because I don't just shoot everything and see what I end up with anymore, now I plan shots and can't wait to tank them in and see how they are. Usually getting what I want in way fewer takes
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Old August 12th, 2010, 05:52 PM   #7
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For a good video you need:
* A good lens
* A nice, well framed scene
* Good, interesting lighting (natural or otherwise)
* Good settings - manual exposure, white balance and picture style (try Neutral with Sharpness and Contrast at 0 and Saturation at one stop below mid level)
* Good camera stability - shoulder mount, tripod, jib, dolly, Steadicam...
* Optional: some noise reduction processing.
* Nice grading in post.
* A good workflow that doesn't throw away bits. Use 32-bit float or equivalent from noise reduction through to the final grade. You should probably work with a good intermediate codec like Cineform or ProRes.
* A good final encode.

Do all of these steps well, and your video will look as good as anything out there - assuming a bit of artistry with the scene and grading.
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Old August 13th, 2010, 04:50 AM   #8
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Everything that has been said is true, but I think you can reduce your major stumbling block down to one issue, which even though has been stated, I feel deserves to be highlighted and explained properly.

Because your kit lens is not letting in enough light under indoor or low light conditions, your camera is boosting the ISO to gain the correct exposure, therefore increasing noise.

No amount of best practices, improved workflow or camera settings will fix that.

The cheapest way to get a lens that lets in more light is to buy a prime, and the sweet spot for cheap, fast primes is 50mm.

You can choose new or second hand, but make sure you get a lens with f/1.8 or better. I guarantee you will be blown away by the differences, and can start enjoying your camera.

Then you can come back and absorb all the expert points made here to take your work up the next level.

Low hanging fruit first.
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Old August 13th, 2010, 11:53 AM   #9
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Like I said in my post earlier, I am really happy with the results I am getting, but at the same time equal parts flustered and inspired by some of the amazing images other people are getting with these.

I think I am at stage two of the problem. I am getting the shots I want, but I haven't learned to color grade very well and have no clue about how to shoot for the grade. In other words, shoot with the intent of how I want it in post.
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Old August 13th, 2010, 12:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Pryor View Post
First thing to do is turn off everything automatic. Make sure auto shutter is off, as well as auto iris, auto white balance. If you're shooting at 1080p24, the shutter speed should be 1/50. Use an ND filter to control light outdoors. Shoot at the lower ISOs. White balance for the conditions. I use the Neutral setup, modified for what I do. You might want to check the different setups. That could be one thing you're not liking.
Just curious about the shutter speed question. I'm not an expert so I may be doing something wrong but for video on my T2i (soon to be replaced with a 7D) I have always used a low ISO (100 or 200) and changed the aperture to get my desired DOF and then adjusted exposure with the shutter. Yesterday I did an outdoor shoot in full sunlight and with my 50mm 1.4 I used ISO 100, f5.6, and the shutter speeds were cranked up in the 1/800 - 1/2000 range. The video looks absolutely flawless to me.

Is there something technically/mechanically wrong with that or is the end result what I should be concerned with? Cause I'm blown away with how it looks compared to my HMC150. Just need a little bit of color tweaking.
Here's an untouched screen grab...
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7d quality ?-screen-shot-2010-08-12-3.03.48-pm.png  
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Old August 13th, 2010, 12:34 PM   #11
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Your shutter speed should be double that of your frame rate (or as close to it as you can get). I would be very surprised at a 800 shutter that the video doesn't strobe badly. Like the opening scene of "Saving Private Ryan"
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Old August 13th, 2010, 12:39 PM   #12
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nope no strobing at all. I'm cutting it with vid from the HMC150 and it's working great! I monitor my FCP rig through a Matrox MX02 into a Sony Bravia 32" LCD so I would definitely see issues like that.
for safety in the future, would multiples of the frame rate work? I shoot 30p.
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Old August 13th, 2010, 12:49 PM   #13
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That's pretty amazing. Can you please post a small sample and what settings you were on please?
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Old August 13th, 2010, 01:48 PM   #14
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sent an email so I can send a full res file rather than post to vimeo or youtube.
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