Shutter vs Aperture at DVinfo.net

Go Back   DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon GL Series DV Camcorders

Canon GL Series DV Camcorders
Canon GL2, GL1 and PAL versions XM2, XM1.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old August 12th, 2005, 06:13 PM   #1
New Boot
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Lancashire UK
Posts: 21
Shutter vs Aperture

When in manual mode you have a choice of whether to fix shutter or aperture to obtain correct exposure.
On a bright day if I fix shutter at 1/50 (XM2) then I have to engage ND filter to correctly expose using aperture.
Or I can fix aperture at say f5.6 and use shutter to expose correctly without using ND.
Just wondering if there is a preferred method - fix shutter or aperture.
Not bothered about DoF or clear slo-mo.

Mel.
Mel Davies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2005, 08:25 PM   #2
Obstreperous Rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: San Marcos, TX
Posts: 26,900
Images: 513
Correct answer: both. Anybody care to elaborate?
__________________
CH

Search DV Info Net | DV Info Net Sponsors | A Decade (+5) of DVi | ...Tuesday is Soylent Green Day!
Chris Hurd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2005, 02:27 AM   #3
Retired DV Info Net Almunus
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 6,943
My own bias with video cameras is to primarily use aperture to control exposure, employing an ND filter if necessary. Adjusting the shutter speed can lead to some unwanted strobing or stuttering.
__________________
Lady X Films: A lady with a boring wardrobe...and a global mission.

Hey, you don't have enough stuff!
Buy with confidence from our sponsors. Hand-picked as the best in the business...Really!

See some of my work one frame at a time: www.KenTanaka.com
Ken Tanaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2005, 05:11 AM   #4
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 277
Right, so the lowdown on this is that if you adjust your f-stop, you will lose depth of field, and if you adjust shutter, you will get stroby artifacts. Now most of what I do is based in a desire to get a filmlook, so, if you do anything other that 1/60 shutter, you will have a worse time going to 24p. 1/60 is the best shutter for the conversion. And similarly, a shallow DOF is filmic and desirable, so a low aperture is good.

For a program mode, I choose the TV and keep it on 60. But otherwise I pick a manual mode and use ND filters to make sure I can keep the aperture open for DOF and the shutter low for future conversions.

But on a recent thread I heard that the best visual effect, to really make it pop on a television, is a 1/250 shutter and the frame mode.

Actually, if you aren't worried about DOF, then anything will work, but that's my input.

DJ
DJ Kinney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 15th, 2005, 02:32 AM   #5
Major Player
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sherman Oaks CA
Posts: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel Davies
When in manual mode you have a choice of whether to fix shutter or aperture to obtain correct exposure.
On a bright day if I fix shutter at 1/50 (XM2) then I have to engage ND filter to correctly expose using aperture.
Or I can fix aperture at say f5.6 and use shutter to expose correctly without using ND.
Just wondering if there is a preferred method - fix shutter or aperture.
Not bothered about DoF or clear slo-mo.

Mel.
Hey Mel,

I would strongly suggest that you ALWAYS use a ND filter whenever you are shooting outside. It not only cuts the amount of light getting to your lens but it helps to make your skies blue as opposed to white. Not as good as a polarizing filter, but it does help. The shutter will also help bring down your exposure but I use it mostly to soften a background or minimize the roll when shooting a computer screen. These are two totally different options and I encourage you to learn the ins and outs of both. But both can be utilized with great effect and affect when shooting in bright light and you need to limit the light entering the lens and want to acheive a softer and greater DOF.

Long day, and I don't know if this makes sense, but I tried.....

Steph
Stephanie Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 15th, 2005, 05:03 AM   #6
Wrangler
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,298
You should expirement a bit, try various ways under various lighting and determine the artistic merits of each, its limits, and which you prefer.
__________________
dpalomaki@dspalomaki.com
Don Palomaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 15th, 2005, 09:04 AM   #7
Old Boot
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: London UK
Posts: 3,529
Stephanie, "It not only cuts the amount of light getting to your lens but it helps to make your skies blue as opposed to white. "

Oh yes. .. oh yes . . . Now I add filters plus a pola. I LOVE blue skies !

GRAZIE

Last edited by Graham Bernard; August 15th, 2005 at 04:10 PM.
Graham Bernard is offline   Reply
Reply

DV Info Net refers all where-to-buy and where-to-rent questions exclusively to these trusted full line dealers and rental houses...

Professional Video
(800) 833-4801
Portland, OR

B&H Photo Video
(866) 521-7381
New York, NY

Z.G.C.
(973) 335-4460
Mountain Lakes, NJ

Abel Cine Tech
(888) 700-4416
N.Y. NY & L.A. CA

Precision Camera
(800) 677-1023
Austin, TX

DV Info Net also encourages you to support local businesses and buy from an authorized dealer in your neighborhood.
  You are here: DV Info Net > Canon EOS / MXF / AVCHD / HDV / DV Camera Systems > Canon HDV and DV Camera Systems > Canon XL and GL Series DV Camcorders > Canon GL Series DV Camcorders

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

 



Google
 

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:03 PM.


DV Info Net -- Real Names, Real People, Real Info!
1998-2017 The Digital Video Information Network