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Old September 3rd, 2020, 10:45 PM   #31
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

For sure the mirror is the heart of the problem. Wait a second the A7S doesn't have mirror. maybe its too vertical
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Old September 3rd, 2020, 10:49 PM   #32
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

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Originally Posted by Pete Cofrancesco View Post
gimbal op for his movies is a friend who owns a cheap gimbal that they can throw someone's camera on that they've borrowed for the day. I laugh that you wouldn't know that dslr/mirrorless cameras might have problems with rolling shutter and verticals.
Oh but you said, that mirrorless cameras have problem with rolling shutter.
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Old September 3rd, 2020, 11:05 PM   #33
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

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Oh but you said, that mirrorless cameras have problem with rolling shutter.
I'll let you in on a secret the mirror has nothing to do with rolling shutter.
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Old September 3rd, 2020, 11:19 PM   #34
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

Oh okay, I thought that the rolling shutter jello effect, was caused by the fact that it wasn't a global shutter, unless there is more to it?
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Old September 4th, 2020, 12:11 AM   #35
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

Ryan, we gave you a little test to see if you understand what you are talking about. You failed I'm afraid. You need to do some serious study on the causes of the reasons objects look different shapes to reality when shot by cameras that use alternative capture techniques. You need to go back first to optics development in film based camera to understand the concept of mechanical shutter angles before you start looking at electronic versions. Your current problem needs breaking down properly into cause and effect, before you have any hope of being able to accurately predict the behaviour of products as yet only seen on a computer screen. Serious hard work research, study and learning. You know the words, but are using them poorly because all our comment based on you having understanding you actually don't have.
Sorry, but until you understand the physics going on here you are stuck.
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Old September 4th, 2020, 12:43 AM   #36
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

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Originally Posted by Ryan Elder View Post
Oh okay, I thought that the rolling shutter jello effect, was caused by the fact that it wasn't a global shutter, unless there is more to it?
CMOS sensors will have a rolling shutter effect, regardless of if they have a mirror or no mirror. Professional cameras designed purely for video or cinema production tend to have less of this artifact than stills cameras used for shooting video. However, how much will vary from one camera model to another, so you need to test the camera before shooting with it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_shutter

Interestingly, I could get a rolling shutter effect in the CRT viewfinder of a CCD camera when in progressive frame mode because of the scanning in the viewfinder. It happened when you whipped panned.

You can also have the effect on some stills camera shutters. It was quite effective in giving the impression of speed in some early racing car photographs because of the skewed verticals.
http://www.artnet.com/artists/jacque...YzDwkoUZvXPhQ2

Last edited by Brian Drysdale; September 4th, 2020 at 01:32 AM.
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Old September 4th, 2020, 03:28 AM   #37
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

You just made me think Brian. I did a series of promo work for a parachuting company last year and used a B4 lens on my JVC 750 to get the extra reach to fill the frame with the aircraft at dropping altitude. The first weekend revealed lots of physical issues - mainly my inability to do a 360 around the tripod legs with my eye to the viewfinder, because in bright sunlight the flip out viewfinder was wiped out. I bought an ultra bright external viewfinder with SDI in and side mounted this so I could pan and tilt standing back, and it was brilliant. However you just hit on the reason for the strange treatment of the trees when they got close to the ground and the trees and horizon objects started to appear in the viewfinder framing.In the video files it's perfectly fine, but in the new monitor, very strange artefacts. It didn't matter at the time because the footage was fine, but I bet this is related to your discovery. Sort of a scan of a scan of the frame.
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Old September 4th, 2020, 04:06 PM   #38
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Drysdale View Post
CMOS sensors will have a rolling shutter effect, regardless of if they have a mirror or no mirror. Professional cameras designed purely for video or cinema production tend to have less of this artifact than stills cameras used for shooting video. However, how much will vary from one camera model to another, so you need to test the camera before shooting with it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_shutter

Interestingly, I could get a rolling shutter effect in the CRT viewfinder of a CCD camera when in progressive frame mode because of the scanning in the viewfinder. It happened when you whipped panned.

You can also have the effect on some stills camera shutters. It was quite effective in giving the impression of speed in some early racing car photographs because of the skewed verticals.
Grand Prix of the Automobile Club of France, Course at Dieppe by Jacques Henri Lartigue on artnet
Oh okay. Well the next camera I was thinking of investing in was the BMPCC, and since that was meant for shooting video, would it have less of a rolling shutter effect therefore?
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Old September 4th, 2020, 04:35 PM   #39
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Re: Is this a good way to fix this rolling shutter issue?

https://www.cined.com/blackmagic-poc...-shutter-more/

There's lots of forum chat about it.
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