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Wedding / Event Videography Techniques
Shooting non-repeatable events: weddings, recitals, plays, performances...

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Old March 14th, 2017, 12:19 PM   #1
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Gimbal work

Anyone here use it? I've been revisiting it looking at mechical and electronic gimbals. Years ago I owned a Glidecam but I sold it because I found it too heavy and difficult to balance. But now that cameras have gotten smaller and lighter...

There are a lot of areas in a wedding that I think it adds a nice touch processions, first dances, broll, etc. But it still is taxing to operate if you're a solo shooter.

Outside of small indy films where you can plan out your movements I think it has limited use.
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Old March 14th, 2017, 12:43 PM   #2
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Re: Gimbal work

Use it all the time. Guests arrival, Bride's arrival at the church. Quickly removing the camera and placing it on a battery pack mounted to a tripod that's pre-setup in the church for the service. I've used it for the Bride and Groom leaving the church if I have time whilst Photos are being taken after the signing of the register. If not, I set it up for the confetti throwing after the church, then film the Bride and Groom leaving the church by the car.

If I can over take the car, I then use it for the Bride and Groom's arrival. Plus Guests mingling. Little bit of the Photo shoot. I have used it for the Line Up and nearly always for the Bride and Groom's entrance at the start of the Wedding Breakfast.

After that, it becomes less used as my current gimbal is pre-balanced by the manufacturer to my GH4 and f2.8 12-35 lens. Which is less welcome once the evening begins. However I have used it occasionally for the 1st Dance and Jewish Dancing too to good effect.

So despite being a solo shooter, it has gotten loads of use last year. So much so that the Batteries are now wearing thin - all 3 of them. However I am thinking of getting the new Nebula, with handle controls and which will allow balancing for a number of lenses. Still keep the old Gimbal as it balances quickly and with some new Batteries would still play a part. A key item in my equipment. Marvellous tool.
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Old March 14th, 2017, 01:10 PM   #3
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Re: Gimbal work

Can't live without it :) I start using it from the ceremony or photoshoot and use it until I stop shooting after the dancing, I know exactly which shots I need for the edit so that I don't overuse it, I use it for following shots:
- One walking shot during teh photoshoot
- Bride arriving at church/ceremony
- One forward moving shot through the aisle
- Couple leaving the Church/ceremony
- A few shots at the reception
- A few shots of the venue without the guests
- The first entrance of the couple (I follow them from behind and then lift the camera up so you see the entire venue)
- A shot of the waiters serving food and/or drinks
- A few shots of a full venue
- The cake cutting (I follow the waiters when they bring in the cake)
- The first dance and dancing after that.

I make sure that I have enough handheld or tripod shots, steadycam is maybe 5% of the entire film but it gives a nice extra dimension.

I shoot with a gh4 and a 12mm f2.0 all the time on a gimbal and have a blackbird steadicam as backup.
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Old March 14th, 2017, 02:30 PM   #4
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Re: Gimbal work

I've been watching YouTube reviews and tutorials. I actually like the look of the mechanical gimbals. They're less complicated, no batteries, or electronics to go wrong, and inexpensive . Of course it's only as good as the skill of the person who's operating it.

To me the hardest part is moving fluidly in a crowded environment, not touching the camera, transitioning between flying, what movements you can pull off, in sunny situations being able to monitor focus, framing and exposure. Basically there's no substitute for experience.

I like this review. It didn't hurt that he has one hell of a hot "cousin" .

I found this video encouraging because he gives it to inexperienced users who still get good results.

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Old March 14th, 2017, 04:27 PM   #5
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Re: Gimbal work

Using just one arm is the problem! I can't handle more than a couple of minutes at a time, and thats with a light weight one.
I use a Flycam Nano, with a Panasonic LX100.
I've rigged it with two handles, and use BOTH my index fingers to steer. I can use it this way all day if needed, no worries..
Was going to update to an electronic gimbal, but am happy with this setup so far.

I've got some pics of this setup in this thread...http://www.dvinfo.net/forum/sony-rx-...-rx100-iv.html
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Old March 15th, 2017, 01:25 PM   #6
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Re: Gimbal work

Hi Noa
Do you leave the GH4 on the gimbal all day or take it on and off as required? Do you have to constantly re-balance and how long does it take? Which gimbal are you currently using?
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Old March 15th, 2017, 01:59 PM   #7
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Re: Gimbal work

I leave my gh4 with a 12mm f2.0 the entire day on a Zhiyun Crane Gimbal, I balance the camera once the day before a wedding which takes me a minute and then put it in a bag for transport the next day. Never have to re-balance it again during the day, just switch it on and ready to go. I might use a tripod adapter for my next weddings though so I can take the camera off if needed, that should also not require any rebalancing if I would re-attach the camera.
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Old March 16th, 2017, 01:20 PM   #8
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Re: Gimbal work

I was using a GlideCam for years, but recently moved to an electronic gimbal - the Beholder DS-1. I love using it and use it almost exclusively because it's just as easy to shoot a static shot as it is a moving shot off of it. Of course I do have another camera rigged up on a monopod that I switch back and forth between. Just balance it with a quick release so you can switch it out easily. Batteries last a long time, I have three sets, but have only ever used two. I usually switch them out towards the beginning of the reception.
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Old March 21st, 2017, 09:05 AM   #9
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Re: Gimbal work

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Burkett View Post
I set it up for the confetti throwing after the church, then film the Bride and Groom leaving the church by the car.

If I can over take the car, I then use it for the Bride and Groom's arrival
Impressed - as a solo shooter you get to the reception before the bride and groom - at what point Steve do you collect all your gear from the church?
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Old March 21st, 2017, 09:14 AM   #10
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Re: Gimbal work

I would find capturing the couples arrival at the reception not important, a nice shot of them leaving church is sufficient. It's also not worth forgetting a piece of equipment because you have to move fast and then race to the venue and maybe get a speeding ticket, for just a arrival shot. Doesn't add anything to the film if you ask me.
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Old March 21st, 2017, 09:30 AM   #11
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Re: Gimbal work

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Rush View Post
Impressed - as a solo shooter you get to the reception before the bride and groom - at what point Steve do you collect all your gear from the church?
To be fair, this doesn't happen all the time and only when there are photos being taken after the service. It takes me 5 mins to pack up, then a few more to load into the car. Then I'm filming the rest of the photo session, confetti if it isn't straight after the service and then the couple's departure. I have a good routine and everything in my bag has a precise place, so I can see at a glance if anything is missing. I did leave my monopod once behind; which only happened last year as I moved to the Gimbal more and therefore switched to it at the end of the church service. Had to go back later during the meal and get it. However now I have stopped using a monopod, that issue is no longer a problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noa Put View Post
I would find capturing the couples arrival at the reception not important, a nice shot of them leaving church is sufficient. It's also not worth forgetting a piece of equipment because you have to move fast and then race to the venue and maybe get a speeding ticket, for just a arrival shot. Doesn't add anything to the film if you ask me.
Not important but still a nice thing to get if I can. I don't rush to leave the church; in fact, to avoid having my stuff locked in (happened once very early on), I always get my gear out very quickly. I don't have to speed. Fancy cars drive slowly and if the route allows for shortcuts avoided by the Wedding car or even better a dual carriageway, its quite practical to do so.

In fact my best example wasn't to do with the Wedding car but the Groom and Ushers leaving their house after getting ready and heading to a venue 35 mins away. I filmed their departure as they left in a fancy looking sports car. Then get on with own car and thanks to a great satnav, avoided some queuing on a busy road called the A3, just outside a town called Guildford. Clearly they stuck to it and enabled me to arrive 5 mins before they did to film their arrival. An Usher's first words upon seeing me was 'how the hell did he get there ahead of us'. I confess I exaggerated and said I arrived over 10 mins ago.

Still it impresses them when they see me filming both departure and arrival, as it does the couple when circumstances allow for it. Anything that makes me look good in the eyes of my customers has value. :)
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Old March 21st, 2017, 02:14 PM   #12
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Re: Gimbal work

Reading that reminds me of the challenges of packing up your equipment to get to the next venue. Especially if you're filming arrivals and departures.

Does anyone know if you can turn the stabilizer bottom part with the weights sideways so you can bring it closer to your body without hitting you? I saw someone recommending it. I've noticed the Glidecam hd can be quite long but I always see it aligned with axis of the lens.
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Old March 22nd, 2017, 01:57 AM   #13
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Re: Gimbal work

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Rush View Post
Impressed - as a solo shooter you get to the reception before the bride and groom - at what point Steve do you collect all your gear from the church?
In my experience the swanky wedding car will take a circuitous route & drive slowly from church to reception & may even stop on the way while the bride & groom enjoy a glass of champagne at some beauty spot. It's all designed so that all the guests are at the reception before the bride & groom.
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Old March 29th, 2017, 11:48 PM   #14
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Re: Gimbal work

Steve,

If your considering manual stabilizers? Don't forget to consider the Black Bird by Camera Motion Research. I love mine. I don't use it for my work a lot but when I do I can pull off a shot or two even with my limited training and time on it.

Here is the link for the whole kit: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...lizer_Kit.html


You can get the stabilizer without accessories for less. I did that. Then I went back and got the whole thing. That is when I realized what a mistake it was not to get the kit. If your new to stabilizers (I know your not) get ALL OF the kit! It will balance better than you can do other wise. You will be ten times faster, ten times better.


I think they are a DVI sponsor. I had to deal with customer service once and it blew me away.

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Old May 1st, 2017, 02:29 PM   #15
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Re: Gimbal work

hi everyone...I bought a Blackbird stabilizer from a friend last year with the idea of using it with my Canon C100 mk2....! right...! I was obviously crazy! Too heavy no matter what...so I decided to buy a Zhiyun Crane V 2.0 which is coming from amazon this week. I will use it with Canon 70D and a Canon 10-18mm STM lens which should give me good B roll footage to use with my Canon C100 mk2 footage in weddings etc..not perfect but doable I hope it's not too heavy Now, I also have a little Sony RX100 IV which I intend to try with the gimbal also, recording at 120fps mostly. I know that the Sony may be a little too light for the gimbal but I could use a manfrotto QR or even a Meikon camera housing-I'll see...
my question is...what other small camera would give me GREAT 1080p footage while mounted on the gimbal thati is better than the RX100 IV? I read that the Sony A6500 is good for video? Don't want to pay thousands for the top Alpha models...the idea would be to combine my footage with the C100 mk2..I hope the 70D/100RX IV can work fine.
thanks
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