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-   -   First shoot, first impressions for HVR-HD1000 (https://www.dvinfo.net/forum/sony-hvr-hd1000/110860-first-shoot-first-impressions-hvr-hd1000.html)

Jurgen Geevels February 9th, 2008 05:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Asaf Benatia (Post 823054)
Hi, Looks great!
can you please check what we all looking for? a brife shoot on a dance floor with a LED video light on camera or a 30-40w video light? and post the footage?

Sorry but I think nearly every camera above 500 euro can produce such image nowadays, think you can only judge it uncompressed

Duane Steiner February 15th, 2008 03:42 PM

My first video using the HD1000.

http://www.speedandmotion.com/pages/scs021008.html

Duane Steiner February 25th, 2008 07:33 PM

Went to a car event with the HD1000. Still takes some getting used to and keeping it still. But overall very happy with it. The battery life is amazing (used a Impact version of the MP-F770). Used the digital zoom, I know not the best, and it worked good. Next purchase though will be a Telephoto Converter.

Here is the video from the event http://www.speedandmotion.com/pages/...dyevent08.html

Wade Davis March 8th, 2008 11:53 AM

Hvr-hd1000
 
This site is a rookies dream.I had many questions about the HVR-HD1000 that have now be settled after watching the posted videos. I am looking to use the cam for a local cable talk show on a budget. I believe I will be okay. Thanks guys.

John Luna March 13th, 2008 09:42 AM

Pan Blur
 
Is it possible to pan at all with this camera. Or is this a HDV thing, when I pan the images blurs. Well just got mine yesterday. It's not the prettiest camera around, but it does look professional. Pretty simple to use. Took me a few minutes to figure out that you can adjust the viewfinder (pull it out from to adjust for your eye). I didn't think I would like the touch menu but it's very simple and easy to use. I don't know how to use the camera yet, I have to shoot with it for a while. My exposure with manual and snow is a little off, I am going to adjust the brightness of the LCD to give me a level that is close to the exposure I want.

John

Andrew Kiu March 27th, 2008 04:57 AM

Canon 3CCD vs. SONY 1 CMOS Sensor?
 
I really plan to order this Sony HVR-HD1000, 1st thing keep bothered me is this Real quality cam compared with 3CCD? Currently i was using Canon Xl1s, Is this comparable or better than my Xl1s? since is only Single CMOS Chip sensor?

Appreciated if Anyone can advice me on this 3CCD vs. 1 CMOS Sensor

John Luna March 27th, 2008 06:47 AM

I own a XL1 and love the camera but the image does not compare to HDV. I am amazed at the quality. I still haven't shot a lot of footage but as long as I don't do pans it looks great, oh and the pans don't bother me as much on the 32" LCD then they do when I was watching on the computer.

John

Andrew Kiu March 27th, 2008 10:10 AM

Sony HVR-HD1000 (single CMOS DV format) Vs. Canon Xl1 (3CCD DV)
 
Thanks John,
Have u try Shoot using DV format setting with Sony HVR-HD1000?
Sony HVR-HD1000 (single CMOS DV format) Vs. Canon Xl1 (3CCD DV)
*Cos sometime clients still required to shoot on DV format

Any Idea?

John Luna March 28th, 2008 02:21 PM

Hi Andrew,

I don't think I will ever shoot in DV again. I will always shoot in HDV and downconvert if the clients wants DV. Having the option to have both is great I think.


John

Andrew Kiu March 29th, 2008 10:28 AM

John,
Shooting in HDV format are more costly especially Buying HDV Cassettes,
If the final media ONLY required SD/DV by clients (Then the Only cost saving is using SD MiniDV Cassettes)

Since HDV are still very new at our region. not many clients demand on HDV at the moment.

Have you test on DV format without downconvert it? How effective the quality compare with 3CCD.

Adam Gold March 29th, 2008 11:46 AM

Don't waste your money on HDV tapes; then it won't be more expensive to shoot in HDV.

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/showthrea...880#post850545

John Luna March 31st, 2008 01:31 PM

Andrew,

I am using standard Sony Mini DV tapes and they work just fine.

John

Johnnie Caraballo April 7th, 2008 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Adam Gold (Post 850662)
Don't waste your money on HDV tapes; then it won't be more expensive to shoot in HDV.

Can you re-use HDV Tapes over and over to save money?

Ervin Farkas April 8th, 2008 06:42 AM

It's the same as with regular tapes.

Technically yes, it's up to you if you're willing to put up with occasional dropouts. Reuse them for non-critical stuff (playing around), but not for times where you need to make sure your recording is flawless.

Chris Hurd April 8th, 2008 08:28 AM

If you're earning money by shooting a paying job, then buy the most expensive HDV tapes you can afford. If it's just for personal use, then it doesn't matter as long as you don't mind the occasional dropout or glitch.

Duane Steiner April 8th, 2008 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris Hurd (Post 856365)
If you're earning money by shooting a paying job, then buy the most expensive HDV tapes you can afford. If it's just for personal use, then it doesn't matter as long as you don't mind the occasional dropout or glitch.

Question about tapes, is it ok to mix brands?

Adam Gold April 8th, 2008 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duane Steiner (Post 856381)
Question about tapes, is it ok to mix brands?

The general consensus is no, due to the differing lubricants used by different mfrs. If you switch then you should use a cleaning cassette between brands.

Bill Moede April 12th, 2008 02:08 PM

HVR-HD1000 vs Canon XL2 and GL2
 
I currently shoot with Canon XL2 and GL2 cameras; musical theatre, weddings commercial training, education and documentaries. Have any of you done a direct comparison between the HVR-HD1000 and some of the popular 3 ccd cameras.

William Hohauser April 12th, 2008 06:21 PM

Earlier in this thread I posted my experiences comparing the JVC HD-100, the Sony PD 170 and the HD1000.

Maximilian Pinedo April 19th, 2008 08:25 PM

HD 1000u Microphone
 
I filmed a birthday party for a costumer and 3 weeks later I was notified of the incredible sound reproduced by the microphone. The customer said that while watching the DVD of the party in a stereo TV with external speakers the sound and voices seemed to pop out of the different places of the room just as if they were right there. I immediately took a copy of the DVD and in my humble stereo non-surround component could hear exactly what the person told me, something I never experienced before, the sound was 'quadraphonic' a there was an eerie presence of the music voices, laughter, steps, etc. It sounded juts as in a sorround system, something neither the customer nor I have?
Has anyone had a similar experience?

Johnnie Caraballo April 20th, 2008 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maximilian Pinedo (Post 863698)
I filmed a birthday party for a costumer and 3 weeks later I was notified of the incredible sound reproduced by the microphone. The customer said that while watching the DVD of the party in a stereo TV with external speakers the sound and voices seemed to pop out of the different places of the room just as if they were right there. I immediately took a copy of the DVD and in my humble stereo non-surround component could hear exactly what the person told me, something I never experienced before, the sound was 'quadraphonic' a there was an eerie presence of the music voices, laughter, steps, etc. It sounded juts as in a sorround system, something neither the customer nor I have?
Has anyone had a similar experience?

What did you use to edit your video?

Maximilian Pinedo April 20th, 2008 02:38 PM

I use Premiere Pro and I have checked other projects and they alll sound the same way when filmed with the HD1000u
Thanks

Ed Sharpe April 29th, 2008 12:14 AM

why both video and stills
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Johnnie Caraballo (Post 806463)
I'm just curious why all the attention on taking photos with a Video Cam. Am I missing something here?

I do journalism work both video and stills.... need both... expect both..

I like what I see so far.....l

Ed!

Ed Sharpe April 29th, 2008 12:33 AM

hi res stills
 
this is supposed to alsop shoot 4 and 7 megga pix top a memory card?

explain? examples... how do you like it etc///

William Hohauser May 18th, 2008 05:43 PM

Shooting a concert
 
Just shot a concert from the balcony. Here are some working observations:

Exposure: The concert was an exposure nightmare as the lighting kept changing from one song to the next with no consistency in foot-candles. The limited control offered by the camera was a challenge.

Focus: The band was far away enough that I had to shoot with the lens zoomed in for most of the time. The low lighting kept the aperture open so my depth-of-field was very shallow. The low res LCD made manual focusing hard and the auto focus kept going out as the musicians moved around.

Working solution: I set the lens ring to control the exposure, turned on the zebra stripes for 100% and used the spot focus function on the fold-up LCD screen. By watching the zebra stripes I had a good idea of the exposure and could adjust with the lens ring. When I changed shots I used the spot focus to adjust the focus. Spot focus works really well.

A few problems with this method:
The Spot Focus screen removes all normal LCD re-outs except the time code of the tape. No audio levels, no battery count and, worst of all, no exposure bar. This meant that I was entirely in the dark about the gain since that is hooked into the exposure settings. In addition the spot focus screen puts a large white box outline in the center of the screen. This made composing the shot really difficult. Screen clutter is a problem with a lot of cameras but this really altered the way I was composing.

Result: A mostly decent document of the concert. When everything was working well the shots came out really nice.

Johnnie Caraballo May 19th, 2008 02:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William Hohauser (Post 879628)
Just shot a concert from the balcony. Here are some working observations:

Exposure: The concert was an exposure nightmare as the lighting kept changing from one song to the next with no consistency in foot-candles. The limited control offered by the camera was a challenge.

Focus: The band was far away enough that I had to shoot with the lens zoomed in for most of the time. The low lighting kept the aperture open so my depth-of-field was very shallow. The low res LCD made manual focusing hard and the auto focus kept going out as the musicians moved around.

Working solution: I set the lens ring to control the exposure, turned on the zebra stripes for 100% and used the spot focus function on the fold-up LCD screen. By watching the zebra stripes I had a good idea of the exposure and could adjust with the lens ring. When I changed shots I used the spot focus to adjust the focus. Spot focus works really well.

A few problems with this method:
The Spot Focus screen removes all normal LCD re-outs except the time code of the tape. No audio levels, no battery count and, worst of all, no exposure bar. This meant that I was entirely in the dark about the gain since that is hooked into the exposure settings. In addition the spot focus screen puts a large white box outline in the center of the screen. This made composing the shot really difficult. Screen clutter is a problem with a lot of cameras but this really altered the way I was composing.

Result: A mostly decent document of the concert. When everything was working well the shots came out really nice.

Do you mind posting that video so that I can see what it came out like?

William Hohauser May 20th, 2008 10:22 AM

I ask the client if that's acceptable.

John Luna May 21st, 2008 07:50 AM

Hi William,

Thanks for the shoot info. I am experimenting with focusing. I like to Zoom in use auto focus to get the focus then change to manual and re frame the shot. I do this using the manual button and the ring to choose between exposure and focus. Takes a little time but seems to work fine. I am going to try the spot focus and see how that works. Can you tell me why you use Zebra at 100 instead of 75. I am also having problems with gain. How do you stop the gain from automatically starting.

Thanks,

John

William Hohauser May 21st, 2008 10:46 AM

I find the spot focus is very responsive even when the camera is set at a slower shutter speed. Takes less time time then zooming in and deactivating the focus which is clumsy on this camera, especially if you have the exposure in manual control.

I set the zebra to 100% for one reason, I can't stand the viewfinder screen clutter already and the strobing zebra stripes send me towards the edge.

Unfortunately, this camera's workings are not designed for gain savvy videographers, it's designed for home consumers who want a decent exposure regardless of the noise. The only way to avoid gain is to memorize where on the exposure bar the gain starts and that's very hard to figure out, I really haven't yet. Sony should address this. I hate to say it, especially with my previous comment about screen clutter, but there should be a f-stop and gain readout in the viewfinder.

Adam Gold May 21st, 2008 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William Hohauser (Post 881098)
The only way to avoid gain is to memorize where on the exposure bar the gain starts and that's very hard to figure out, I really haven't yet.

It's actually pretty easy. In most modes, gain is added last and in 3dB increments. So just count backwards from the right however many clicks you are and do the math.

Our last shoot we decided we wanted no more than 9dB gain under any circumstances, so we were always no more to the right than click #4. (From the rightmost: 18, 15, 12, 9... etc.).

But they absolutely should have the continuous data readout in the FX7 style...

John Luna May 21st, 2008 01:25 PM

Thanks William and Adam,

I will take a look at the meter and experiment with the gain.

Thanks again,

John

William Hohauser May 21st, 2008 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Adam Gold (Post 881118)
It's actually pretty easy. In most modes, gain is added last and in 3dB increments. So just count backwards from the right however many clicks you are and do the math.

Our last shoot we decided we wanted no more than 9dB gain under any circumstances, so we were always no more to the right than click #4. (From the rightmost: 18, 15, 12, 9... etc.).

But they absolutely should have the continuous data readout in the FX7 style...

That does work and I have done that. However doing that while shooting in a live environment results in footage that is unusable. Other Sony cameras have a little arrow on the zoom bar telling you when you have reached the end of the lens zoom and are crossing over into digital zoom land. That would be nice here but since it isn't I am trying to memorize the spot with limited success so far. And yes, 9dB seems to be the limit before the camera starts to really noise up.

Adam Gold May 22nd, 2008 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William Hohauser (Post 881353)
...doing that while shooting in a live environment results in footage that is unusable.

Really? Why? Unusable how? Too light? Dark? Noisy? Out of focus?

For us it was a simple matter of using the Zebra to avoid blowing out highlights and having the guy on the HD1000 just ride the exposure ring the whole time. His instructions were to crank up the exposure as far as necessary, but never to exceed position #4. If he saw a lot of Zebra then he dialed down until just a few highlights had stripes. In post, it was easy to tweak minimally to match to the FX1s and FX7s that formed the bulk of the footage. Looking at the Blu-Ray version of the production, it's almost impossible to tell what footage was shot by what cam, unless you knew were each was.

It's easy to tell where you are on the exposure bar since the little indicator line is one click wide, so just look for triple the width of the line to right right of it in the exposure bar. We pretty much left it there all the time and just cranked it down when the lighting was really bright, then back up again as needed. Our shooter had no trouble doing this... and he's a high school junior.

The HD1000 may have problems, but using manual exposure isn't one of them. At least for us.

William Hohauser May 22nd, 2008 01:13 PM

Remember....

If the spot focus screen is selected, the exposure bar is no longer displayed. You only have the zebra stripes to go by. That works until the light goes low enough that the camera switches to high gain and you don't know it until you get back to the office. I rather underexposed with less gain which I can tweak in editing but while the spot focus is going there is no way to know. Of course I could exit the spot focus function but that opens up another set of problems in an unpredictable live situation.

Also overexposed footage is unusable if it's in the middle of a song and you are running the only camera recording the event. It's not what the client wants. Of course if the lighting was stable everything you suggest is a great way to go.

I post these comments so people can make a decision about buying one or learn a shooting method that is unique to this camera not to demean the camera. Also so someone like you can respond with their own, better, ways to operate what is essentially a compromised camera.

PS. I have been using the camera to shoot a sculpture demolition this past week. Outdoors, with a polarizing filter, this camera works great, auto-focus, zoom, auto-white balance. My shots have a 95% success ratio (not counting bad composition)! Great footage of which I'll post selections soon.

Adam Gold May 22nd, 2008 01:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William Hohauser (Post 881725)
Remember....

If the spot focus screen is selected, the exposure bar is no longer displayed.

Ah! Now I understand what you mean...

Our case was very different. With the cam locked down on a tripod for our multicam stage shoot, focus was fixed on manual. A very different situation from your conditions.

Duane Steiner May 22nd, 2008 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William Hohauser (Post 881725)
Outdoors, with a polarizing filter, this camera works great, auto-focus, zoom, auto-white balance.

What type of polarizer filter works best, circular or linear?

Adam Gunn July 25th, 2008 03:35 AM

ey
 
Would this camera be suitable for youtube short comedy films?
I hope so :)

Adam Gold July 25th, 2008 11:46 AM

ANY camera would be suitable for anything on YouTube.

Anmol Mishra March 4th, 2011 11:48 PM

Re: First shoot, first impressions for HVR-HD1000
 
Did anyone figure out if any HDMI capture cards are able to acquire the xvYCC color space ?

Turns out that Blackmagic does not :(


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